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UKAID Department for International Development (R4D) 2005

The Good Seed Initiative - sharing the learning from CPP programmes into pro-poor seed systems in East Africa

Seed Pro-Poor

UKAID Department for International Development (R4D)

Titre : The Good Seed Initiative - sharing the learning from CPP programmes into pro-poor seed systems in East Africa

Projet de recherche pour le Développement : R8480

DFID Programme : Crop Protection

Organismes de mise en œuvre
Lead Institutes : CABI Bioscience (CABi Bio)
Managing Institutes : Natural Resources International Limited (NRIL)
Collaborating Institutes : Kenya Plant Health Inspection Service ; Namulonge Agricultural and Animal Production Research Institute (NAARI) ; Sokoine University of Agriculture

Durée : 01-03-2005 / 30-01-2006

Objectifs
Measures to ensure the quality and health of farm-saved and traded seed among the poor taken up and institutionalised within the operation of East African institutions, national legislation and procedures In Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), seed saved from farmers’ own harvests is the dominant seed source for 80-90% of smallholder farmers, both for use by the growers’ themselves and for sharing through social networks. It is estimated that as much as 30% of kale seed used by smallholder farmers in Kenya is produced by the informal seed sector. This seed is available, affordable, trusted by farmers, and has many known and valued uses. In addition, the informal seed sector includes NGOs, and other groups who multiply seed for distribution to other farmers and farmers who produce seeds for their own future use. However, farmer saved seed stocks face disruption due to natural and civil upheavals, drought, pest and diseases. Furthermore, whilst the genetic traits of farmers’ materials and landraces are favorable for some uses, new varieties offer scope for pest management through the introduction of new genetic resistance. New varieties also contain many of the outcomes of research investment in genetic traits for tolerance to changing physical conditions and to meet the changing needs of markets. CPP and CABI projects are highlighting different and complementary approaches where farmers see for themselves the value of improving their own seed management, and acquire new understanding of the importance of seed.

Total Cost to DFID : £37,700

Présentation : UKAID

Page publiée le 14 septembre 2015, mise à jour le 2 novembre 2017