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UKAID Department for International Development (R4D) 2002

Improving the livelihood of resource-poor goat farmers in Southern Africa through strategic drug and nutritional interventions against gastro-intestinal nematode infections

Poor Farmers Goats Disease

UKAID Department for International Development (R4D)

Titre : Improving the livelihood of resource-poor goat farmers in Southern Africa through strategic drug and nutritional interventions against gastro-intestinal nematode infections

Projet de recherche pour le Développement : R8151

DFID Programme : Animal Health

Organismes de mise en œuvre
Lead Institutes : Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Agricultural Research Council (ARC-OVI)
Managing Institutes : Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh (CTVM)
Collaborating Institutes : Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh (CTVM) ; University of Pretoria

Durée : 01-04-2002 / 30-03-2006

Objectifs
Cost-effective and appropriate strategies developed to control sustainably diseases of livestock in semi-arid, high potential and peri-urban production systems that affect the livelihoods of the poor. Promotion of proven strategies in semi-arid, high potential and peri-urban production systems to control diseases of livestock that affect the livelihoods of the poor.

Résultats
The on-station experiment has been set up and is running smoothly. It consists of 4 groups of 20 goats each, which receive supplementation with urea-molasses blocks in the ,wet,, ,dry, or ,wet, and ,dry, seasons or not at all (control). The animals are grazed during the day and fed their supplements in their pens at night. The ,wet,-season feeding of the groups extended from the beginning of December 2002 until the end of February 2003 (summer) ; the ,dry, season feeding will take place from the beginning of June to the end of August 2003 (winter). Ten goats in each group were given a strategic anthelmintic treatment on 28 January 2003 to comply with the protocol, although the faecal egg counts of the goats in all groups were low (geometric mean < 150 eggs per gram of faeces (epg)). Nevertheless, this led to significant differences in faecal egg counts between treated and non-treated animals on each date of sampling during February 2003 (March statistics not yet available). The low egg counts are probably related to rainfall being lower than normal during August to November (124 mm compared to a 12-year average of 168 mm) and the fact that there is a considerable amount of browse available in the goat camp. Even though rainfall for December 2002 and January and February 2003 was normal, egg counts were low (geometric mean < 250 epg) at the end of February. Significant differences were seen in the egg counts between the 4 supplementation groups on 2 occasions in November and 1 occasion in December 2002. However, clinically these differences were not important (all geometric mean egg counts < 100 epg).
A goatkeepers’ extension manual is being finalised which consists of 12 posters on disease conditions that have been indicated to be important to these farmers and will be presented in a laminated A3 format with a ringbinder. A smaller booklet entitled ,Worms in your goats, sheep and cattle,, to accompany the manual, is being revised. Both the manual and the booklet will be translated from English into Zulu, one of the local languages. This package will be tested in the field by the farmers and their inputs will be considered over a working period of 12 months, before a final revision is produced.
The project is targetting the communities of Hlafuna, Njobokazi and Nkwazela, KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. The socio-economic work for the project is being done by an independent private company, Strategy and Tactics. Preliminary analysis of official 1996 census data for South Africa reveals that there are 3,447 individuals living in the targetted communities, almost all of African race. The majority of the population is female, reflecting the migrant labour pull on rural populations in South Africa. More than a quarter of the population (27.2%) are less than 10 years old, while almost three fifths (58.4%) are less than 20 years old. Focus groups conducted in the communities during February 2003 showed that a high proportion (71.2%) of those who are unemployed are women. All participants at the focus groups corroborated the fact that most people who have remained behind in the communities are women, poor and are struggling to maintain their goats.
The on-station experiment consisted of 4 groups of 18 goats each, artificially infected with Haemonchus contortus larvae following intensive anthelmintic treatment so as to clear previous worm infections. The goats received supplementation with urea-molasses blocks in the wet, dry or wet and dry seasons or not at all (control). The animals were grazed during the day in a pasture, 150 ha. in size, judged to provide good nutritional value both from grazing and browse plant species. The animals were fed their supplements in their pens at night. The wet-season feeding of the groups extended from the beginning of December 2002 until the end of February 2003 (summer) ; the dry-season feeding took place from the beginning of June to the end of August

Total Cost to DFID : £193,417

Présentation : UKAID

Page publiée le 22 septembre 2015, mise à jour le 30 octobre 2017