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2013

Upper Atbara and Setit Dams Complex (Sudan)

Soudan

Titre : Upper Atbara and Setit Dams Complex (Sudan)

Pays de réalisation : Soudan

Date d’accord du prêt : 18/03/2013

Bénéficiaire : Dams Implementation Unit

Objectifs
The project aims at regulating and exploiting the Upper Atbara and Setit rivers’ water by constructing two interconnected dams at Rumela and Burdana sites, and a hydroelectric power plant, to help the development of the Eastern Region of the Republic of Sudan, through boosting the agricultural production, expanding the hydroelectric power generation capacity, as well as increasing the supply of drinking water. The additional water regulated by the dams’ reservoir will be used to intensify the existing agricultural production for 190 thousand hectares in the New Halfa area, presently irrigated from Gashm El-Girba dam, to develop irrigated agriculture for 280 thousand hectares in the Upper Atbara area, to generate electricity, estimated annually at 843 GWh, and to supply drinking water to the city of Gadaref and neighbouring villages.

Coût du projet : KD 512.6 million

Montant du prêt : KD 30.0 million (*) 1 KD is equivalant to about 3.6 US Dollars

Financement : The supplementary loan, along with the previous two Arab Fund’s loans (No. 557/2010 and No. 566/2011) cover about 22% of the total project cost. The Government of Algeria, the Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development, the Saudi Fund for Development, the Islamic Development Bank and the OPEC Fund for International Development, contributed to the financing of the project with loans equivalent to about KD 175 million, representing about 34% of the total project cost. The Government of Sudan will cover the remaining cost of the project and any additional cost that may arise

Forme de concours : prêt

Présentation : AFESD

Page publiée le 27 juin 2015, mise à jour le 16 mai 2019