Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2014 → Kenya’s native goats and sheep, expertly crossbred, are key to helping farmers cope with climate change

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) 2014

Kenya’s native goats and sheep, expertly crossbred, are key to helping farmers cope with climate change

Goats Sheep Climate

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)

Titre : Kenya’s native goats and sheep, expertly crossbred, are key to helping farmers cope with climate change

Région /Pays : Kenya

Date et lieu : The small ruminants’ project for smallholder farming systems has been piloted in the Nyando climate-smart villages (CSVs) of western Kenya since 2014. Here, collective action in seven villages is helping smallholders integrate science approaches to address the effects of climate change and improve their food security.

Présentation
This project is working to improve the productivity of goats and sheep under changing climatic conditions. Using participatory community approaches, the project aims to help farmers increase their small ruminant meat and milk production substantively and sustainably, thereby increasing their household incomes. The science approach focuses on improving local knowledge of climate risks, of variability in seasonal rainfall and of diseases and pests. With participatory testing of resilience-focused crop and livestock technologies generated by CGIAR scientists, and with training to refine local practices and improve planning for changing environmental conditions, farmers can better respond to a more variable climate while also increasing their food and economic security. As part of this process, the project is hoping to develop and up-scale improved livestock breeding programs and strategies for use by farmers. The project researchers are now introducing Galla goats and red Maasai sheep crossed with Dorper sheep. The researchers are also training farmers in improved animal husbandry practices and the importance of keeping good livestock breeding and related records.

Partenaires
Smallholder farmers and pastoral herders in East Africa are the target of an ongoing joint project of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), the Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT) and the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).

Présentation : CGIAR

Page publiée le 17 septembre 2015, mise à jour le 29 novembre 2017