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Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) 2014

Improved Sorghum Technology Adoption in Burkina Faso

Sorghum Technology

Innovations for Poverty Action

Titre : Improved Sorghum Technology Adoption in Burkina Faso

Région /Pays : Burkina Faso

Lieu : 168 villages in three provinces in northern rural areas

Date : 2014-2015

Présentation
Despite the availability of new agricultural technologies, which may increase yields and household income, few sorghum farmers in the Sahel region of Sub-Saharan Africa are using improved seeds and fertilizer. This study evaluates if providing seeds, fertilizer and training to sorghum farmers on “microdosing” increases productivity, and aims to identify the factors that prevent farmers from adopting new technology both on the demand side and the supply side.

Programme
Sorghum is the main food staple and most widely cultivated dryland crop among rural people of the West African Sahel. Despite the potential to attain over two tons per hectare with improved varieties, average sorghum yields in Burkina Faso are estimated at less than half that much. In addition, adoption of sorghum agricultural technology is far less than it is for rice, maize or specialty crops. To explore the reasons behind low adoption, and identify ways to promote higher adoption, researchers at Michigan State University partnered with IPA and the following organizations : AGRODIA, an agricultural non-profit based in Burkina Faso, and INERA, the Environmental Institute for Agricultural Research in Burkina Faso.
Researchers are carrying out a randomized evaluation in 165 villages in northern rural areas of Burkina Faso to evaluate the impact on farmers of providing a “micro-pack” of seeds and fertilizer, along with training on fertilizer “microdosing,” a technique that involves the application of small, affordable quantities of fertilizer using a bottle cap. Researchers are measuring impacts on the sorghum farmers’ productivity, and identifying the factors that prevent farmers from adopting new technology.

Partenaires : Association of Wholesalers and Retailers of Agricultural Inputs (AGRODIA) ; Environmental Institute for Agricultural Research - Burkina Faso (INERA)

Innovation for Poverty Action (IPA)

Page publiée le 25 septembre 2015, mise à jour le 5 avril 2019