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Georg-August University of Goettingen (2000)

Do smallholder farmers benefit more from crossbred (Somali × Anglo-Nubian) than from indigenous goats ?

Ayalew, W

Titre : Do smallholder farmers benefit more from crossbred (Somali × Anglo-Nubian) than from indigenous goats ?

Auteur : Ayalew, W.

Université de soutenance : Georg-August University of Goettingen

Grade : Doctor of Agricultural Sciences 2000

Descriptif
In countries like Ethiopia, development programmes on improvement of livestock production for the dominant smallholder sector nearly always promote improved management combined with the introduction of exotic animals for crossbreeding. The crossbreds are promoted on the premise that they are more productive than the indigenous animals. This was also the concept of the Dairy Goat Development Programme (DGDP), which implemented a comprehensive programme of crossbreeding and improved goat management in the Ethiopian highlands between 1989 and 1997. A year after the DGDP had finished, this study was set up to test the general hypothesis that the benefits that accrue to households from raising crossbred goats under improved management are greater than those from indigenous goats under traditional management. The field data collection was conducted between April 1998 and June 1999. The study covered 275 crossbred (Somali x Anglo-Nubian) and 537 indigenous (Somali, Hararghe Highland) goats belonging to 121 DGDP participant and 37 non-participant (control) households in Gursum and Kombolcha districts of eastern Ethiopia. Three complementary flock-level composite productivity indices were developed, which stemmed from the actual uses of the flocks by aggregating both physical as well as quantifiable socio-economic functions of goats under subsistence production. The indices measure the monetary value of total physical net production (meat, milk, manure), and deduct the total value of purchased external inputs to produce the Values Added of the flocks. Addition of the socio-economic benefits in asset (financing) and security (insurance) to the added values gives the total benefits, or the realized Net Benefits. These were then divided by the three major resources used to produce the benefits, namely size of cultivated land, or metabolic body size of the annualised average flock size, or the estimated household labour input. The resultant three indices, referred to as Unit Net Benefits, were used to test the first and subsequent hypothesis.

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