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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2003

RESEARCH TO DEVELOP STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGES FOR PRESERVING PLANT GENETIC DIVERSITY IN EX SITU GENEBANKS

Plant Genetic Diversity Genebanks

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : RESEARCH TO DEVELOP STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGES FOR PRESERVING PLANT GENETIC DIVERSITY IN EX SITU GENEBANKS

Identification : 5402-21000-011-00D

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Oct 17, 2003 à Jul 22, 2008

Domaine : Plant Genetic Resources ; - Sweet potato ; Apple ; Corn ; Peanut ; Soybean ; Citrus, general/other ; Cross-commodity research—multiple crops ; Seeds and other plant propagules ;

Partenaire : AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE FT. COLLINS,

Objectif
The Plant Germplasm Preservation Research Unit develops cost-effective strategies to conserve the genetic diversity of plants with current or future importance to US agriculture and landscapes. Research is expected to provide a fundamental understanding of preservation technologies within the context of the conservation target (populations, genotypes, genes), other conservation steps (acquisition and regeneration), and the intended use of germplasm (usually breeding or restoration).
Activities will (1) develop tools to expand genebanks’ capacities to assess and efficiently capture genetic diversity (2) enhance longevity of stored germplasm, and (3) improve tools that validate and predict viability and genetic integrity of accessions. The advanced knowledge gained by these activities will lead to economical genebank management and genetic resources that are useful, replenishable and genetically representative of the original population or individual.

Descriptif
The PGPRU integrates mechanistic studies of damage and protection of cells during preservation stresses with population genetic approaches. Physiologically and genetically diverse germplasm is used to determine how cells survive low temperature, desiccation and aging stresses, develop new ways to preserve propagules, and measure health and genetic shifts during genebanking. Quantifying heterogeneity ensures that representative genetic variability is captured and maintained, preservation procedures are broadly applicable, and collection sizes are manageable. The focus on variability and mechanisms of change in genebank collections will be used in models that predict longevity and risks of genetic erosion with different conservation strategies.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 16 décembre 2015, mise à jour le 31 octobre 2017