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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2009 → DEVELOPMENT OF CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS AND ALTERNATIVE BIO-ENERGY CROPS FOR THE CENTRAL GREAT PLAINS REGION

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2009

DEVELOPMENT OF CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS AND ALTERNATIVE BIO-ENERGY CROPS FOR THE CENTRAL GREAT PLAINS REGION

Bio-Energy Crops

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : DEVELOPMENT OF CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS AND ALTERNATIVE BIO-ENERGY CROPS FOR THE CENTRAL GREAT PLAINS REGION

Identification : 3010-12210-001-01

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Sep 15, 2009 à Sep 14, 2014

Partenaires : Colorado State University (CSU) and the USDA-ARS Central Great Plains Research Station in Akron, CO (ARS-Akron).

Objectif
This research project builds upon the cooperative research studies and collaborations of 40+ years between Colorado State University (CSU) and the USDA-ARS Central Great Plains Research Station in Akron, CO (ARS-Akron). This cooperative research project will continue mutual collaborations on the development of bio-energy crop production systems for the Central Great Plains region (CGPR), and assist in the development of biobased technologies to provide opportunities for the production of value-added products that enhance economic benefits to U.S. farmers. ARS-Akron scientists collaborate with CSU scientists on the agronomic development of alternative bio-energy crops for the CGPR. These include : (a) variety testing and selection of the alternative oilseeds spring and winter canola and camelina ; (b) an experiment with skip-row sunflower ; and (c) crop sequencing and seedling establishment studies with canola and camelina. The hypothesizes of these experiments are : (1) small seeded alternative oilseeds (canola and camelina) have a best seeding depth, planting date and cropping sequence for optimal stand establishment and final yield ; (2) small seeded oilseeds will have a better yields when planted in rotation sequence with specific dryland crops ; and (3) alternative oilseeds (sunflower, canola) have an optimal planting architecture that may be different then typical dryland crops. ARS-Akron presently has several ongoing projects with winter wheat to : (a) advance understanding and quantitative knowledge base for crop responses and develop tools to guide optimal management ; and (b) quantify the N use efficiency of select wheat varieties to improve the productivity and quality of winter wheat in dryland cropping systems. The specific research objectives include : (1) Defining crop-sequencing effects on winter wheat yield and the yields of other dryland crops in alternative no-till dryland cropping systems ; (2) N requirement and N response of hard red and hard white winter wheat in no-till and reduce dryland cropping systems ; (3) Evaluating wheat cultivar susceptibility to apparent allelopathic effects of proso millet plant tissue extracts on wheat germination ; and (4) Long term wheat-yield and soil quality response to different residue, tillage and weed management strategies. The proposal is to quantify the N use efficiency (NUE) differences of a select group of winter wheat varieties to a variable N fertility regime. Hypothesis : Different lines of winter wheat will have a different yield response to available N and a different NUE. Likewise, different wheat varieties may have a different grain quality response to applied N (milling, dough mixing and baking).

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 22 octobre 2015, mise à jour le 7 novembre 2017