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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2009 → INTEGRATED INVASIVE SPECIES CONTROL, REVEGETATION, AND ASSESSMENT OF GREAT BASIN RANGELANDS

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2009

INTEGRATED INVASIVE SPECIES CONTROL, REVEGETATION, AND ASSESSMENT OF GREAT BASIN RANGELANDS

Invasives Species Revegetation

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : INTEGRATED INVASIVE SPECIES CONTROL, REVEGETATION, AND ASSESSMENT OF GREAT BASIN RANGELANDS

Identification : 5370-11220-006-00D

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Mar 27, 2009 à Jun 2, 2013

Domaine : Desert and semidesert shrub land and shinnery ; Watersheds ; Pinyon-juniper ; Weeds ;

Partenaire : AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE RENO

Objectif
The Integrated Invasive Species Control, Revegetation, and Assessment of Great Basin Rangelands project has two objectives : 1) Identify and characterize biotic and abiotic conditions and processes that affect plant community factors and ecosystem dynamics on healthy and degraded rangelands to improve the ability to predict how rangelands will respond to changing environmental conditions and alternative management practices and 2) Devise management guidelines, technologies, and practices for conserving and restoring Great Basin rangelands.

Descriptif
The research project is organized into four complementary components : (1) ecology and control of invasive plants, (2) revegetation of degraded rangelands, (3) maintaining and/or enhancing healthy rangelands, and (4) quantifying economic and environmental impacts of management practices at the landscape scale. Experiments will be conducted to understand the seed and seedbed ecology of several native and non-native grasses and shrubs. Herbicides and tillage will be used to vary content of competing vegetation as it affects shrub establishment. Research will be conducted to document ecological processes which control expansion of Western Juniper. Levels of genetic variation of selected plants will be compared between high and low quality ecological conditions sites to determine effects of disturbance on genetic diversity. Rainfall simulators will be used to characterize runoff and soil erosion processes at the scale of a plant community under different manipulative treatments (altered grazing practices, burning, and brush removal) to quantify the hydrologic impact of the conservation practices. The SWAT model will be utilize to evaluate which alternative management scenarios (i.e., a change in vegetation state as represented by changes in canopy and ground cover or vegetation composition by life form) are the most cost effective in achieving the desired environmental benefit

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 7 décembre 2015, mise à jour le 7 novembre 2017