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UKAID Department for International Development (R4D) 1999

Increasing the productivity in smallholder owned goats on Acacia Thornveld (Zimbabwe)

Goats Acacia Thornveld

UKAID Department for International Development (R4D)

Titre : Increasing the productivity in smallholder owned goats on Acacia Thornveld (Zimbabwe)

Pays : Zimbabwe

Projet de recherche pour le Développement : R7351

DFID Programme : Livestock Production

Organismes de mise en œuvre
Lead Institutes : Department of Agriculture, University of Reading ; University of Reading
Managing Institutes : Natural Resources International Limited (NRIL)
Collaborating Institutes : Faculty of Agriculture, University of Zimbabwe ; Matopos Research Station, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural and Technical Services, Zimbabwe ; Ministry of Lands Agriculture and Water Development, Zimbabwe ; Natural Resources Institute (NRI)

Durée : 01-04-1999 à 30-03-2004

Objectif  : Strategies to optimise goat production and to improve its contribution in the crop/livestock farming system through improved allocation and management of locally available Acacia and other tree pods developed and promoted.

Descriptif
This project addresses the problem of low goat productivity on smalholder farms, and the key problem of livestock shortage in the semi-arid areas of Zimbabwe, and other semi-arid regions of South and East Africa. While farmers aspire to own goats and cattle, many of the poorer families have only goats : 99% of the goats in Zimbabwe are found in communal areas under smallholder ownership. Goat herds tend to be small : 82% of small-scale farms own flocks of less than 20 goats, which make up 58% of the total number of goats in Zimbabwe. Goats are largely owned and managed by women. The socio-economic advantages of goat production are high profitability, fast turnover, popular meat, and a ready source of income, eg : for school fees. Goat milk is more digestible than cow’s milk for children. Goat flocks are characterised by frequent abortions, high kid mortality (30-50% up to weaning) and slow growth rates, resulting in delays in attaining breeding age (females) and slaughter weight (males). The major constraint to livestock production in semi-arid areas is poor nutrition caused by a shortage of feed, particularly in the dry season. Feed resources are wasted or under-utilised, and optimal feeding management strategies are important.

Total Cost to DFID : £159,923

Présentation : UKAID

Page publiée le 20 octobre 2015, mise à jour le 28 octobre 2017