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UKAID Department for International Development (R4D) 1999

Transplanting sorghum and pearl millet as a means of increasing food security in semi-arid, low income countries

Sorghum Pearl Millet Transplanting

UKAID Department for International Development (R4D)

Titre : Transplanting sorghum and pearl millet as a means of increasing food security in semi-arid, low income countries

Pays : Zimbabwe

Projet de recherche pour le Développement : R7341

DFID Programme : Rural Livelihoods Flexibility Fund

Organismes de mise en œuvre
Lead Institutes : CAZS Natural Resources, University of Wales, Bangor (CAZS-NR)
Managing Institutes : Rural Livelihoods Department, Department for International Development (UK) (RLD)
Collaborating Institutes : Rural Unity for Development (RUDO) ; Save Valley Research Station

Durée : 01-04-1999 à 30-01-2003

Objectif  : The risk of failed crops or patchy stands minimised and food security increased, ie : an improvement during years when the rain is late ; and a "safety net"of plants provided when the rains are erratic.

Descriptif
Food security is a major problem in semi-arid areas where the rains are erratic and unreliable. In countries such as Zimbabwe seed supply is limited and expensive. When the first plantings fail, both supply and cost can be prohibitive. When crops fail, families have to purchase food from limited funds. Sorghum (the world’s fifth most important cereal) and pearl millet (although less widely grown, a crop with a strong poverty focus) are grown mainly in the semi-arid tropics and sub-tropics, and together form a major food source in Africa. Maize is usually grown in wetter areas, although its popularity is such that, even in zones where success is not guaranteed, farmers continue to plant the crop , often against extension advice. Shortage of water is the most serious constraint on production. In consequence, programmes have been initiated to conserve water for supplementary irrigation during the growing season. However, this project is based on the premise that small amounts of water can be used most efficiently at the beginning of the season, to ’extend’ the effective growing season. The project will target food security and reduction of risk for subsistence farmers in semi-arid countries, where shortage of water is the most serious constraint on production.

Total Cost to DFID : £247,983

Présentation : UKAID

Page publiée le 17 octobre 2015, mise à jour le 28 octobre 2017