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UKAID Department for International Development (R4D) 1997

Environmentally acceptable crop protection strategies based on the improved use of pesticides and adoption of integrated pest management strategies by small-holder farmers in Zimbabwe

Crop Protection Zimbabwe

UKAID Department for international development (R4D)

Titre : Environmentally acceptable crop protection strategies based on the improved use of pesticides and adoption of integrated pest management strategies by small-holder farmers in Zimbabwe

Pays : Zimbabwe

Projet de recherche pour le Développement : R6764

DFID Programme : Crop Protection

Organismes de mise en œuvre
Lead Institutes : Natural Resources Institute (NRI) ; Pest Management Department, Natural Resources Institute
Managing Institutes : Natural Resources International Limited (NRIL)
Collaborating Institutes : Plant Protection Research Institute, Department of Research and Specialist Services, Zimbabwe

Durée : 01-01-1997 à 30-03-2001

Objectif  : Environmentally acceptable herbicides, fungicides and bactericides, and agrochemical use systems, for application by small-holders and estate workers, promoted and adopted.

Descriptif
The farming community in Zimbabwe produces high potential food and cash crops including vegetables, fruit, cotton, coffee, maize and sorghum. Although production has increased tremendously since the country became independent in 1980, and arable land has been increasing, yields of crops per unit area have been decreasing. In addition to problems of drought and water supply, production of all crops is constrained by a range of pest, disease and weed problems. Among the most important of these are cutworms and Diamond Back Moth on cabbages, nematodes, Late Blight and Helicoverpa on tomatoes, fruit flies, white fly, aphids and nematodes on cucurbits, thrips and various diseases on onions, weeds and stem borer on maize. Cotton is the crop sprayed most by small scale farmers with various bollworm species, cotton stainers, jassids, white fly and weeds being major constraints to production. A concurrent factor has been the shift of production from large scale to smaller scale farms in areas more remote from agricultural support. IPM implementation has been limited so far in Zimbabwe. There is no national institution responsible for formulating and carrying out IPM policies. In response to the scale of pests and diseases, however, the Minister of Lands, Agriculture and Water Development introduced legislation to regulate the importation, sale, experimentation, advertising and use of all agricultural pesticides. The Ministry is also responsible for agricultural research policy, extension and training services. In the absence of any medium- or long-term policy, most of the IPM programmes carried out so far have been ad hoc. They have involved imported natural enemies and technical collaboration with a number of countries including South Africa, Zambia, and USA, Australia and Holland. Major short term benefits will come from improved use of selected pesticides applied in a manner which is safe to the user, the consumer, and the bio-system. The long-term strategy is to reduce reliance on pesticides by adopting a mixed strategy of chemical and biological methodology, including host plant resistance and cultural methods.

Total Cost to DFID : £219,961

Présentation : UKAID

Page publiée le 24 novembre 2015, mise à jour le 24 octobre 2017