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UKAID Department for International Development (R4D) 1994

A study of the Reproductive Biology and Population Differentiation of Bombacopsis Quinata a threatened Central America dry zone tree with potential for semi-arid zones

Bombacopsis Quinata

UKAID Department for International Development (R4D)

Titre : A study of the Reproductive Biology and Population Differentiation of Bombacopsis Quinata a threatened Central America dry zone tree with potential for semi-arid zones.

Pays : Amérique Centrale (Costa Rica, Honduras, Nicaragua)

Projet de recherche pour le Développement : R6168

DFID Programme : Forestry

Organismes de mise en œuvre
Lead Institutes : Oxford Forestry Institute (OFI)
Managing Institutes : Natural Resources International Limited (NRIL)

Durée : Start Date : 01-11-1994 End Date : 30-03-1998

Objectif
1.) To detail the reproductive biology of Bombacopsis quinata. 2.) To gain detailed information describing the genetic variation between and within populations of B. quinata, using material from Costa Rica, Honduras and Nicaragua. 3.) To develop conservation and tree improvement strategies for B. quinata, using the results obtained from (1) and (2) above

Descriptif
Bombacopsis quinata, from Central America, Colombia and Venezuela, is a highly valued timber species. Extensive felling, both legal and illegal, coupled with general deforestation and negative agricultural practices, has reduced B. quinata to a species under severe threat at population level. There is little information regarding the population differentiation and the reproductive biology of the species. Given the growing interest in the use of this species in reafforestation activities these are important gaps in knowledge. Information on both the reproductive biology and population differentiation of B. quinata will provide the basis for the increased production of seed of known and proven genetic quality. This will specifically relate to seed collection protocols, seed orchard design and pollinator enhancement. This will assist in meeting the demand for B. quinata and indirectly promote its conservation through continued use and establishment on farms. In the longer term the results of the investigation of population differentiation, reproductive biology and phenology will be an important element in the design of both in and ex situ conservation strategies.

Total Cost to DFID : £38,900

Présentation : UKAID

Page publiée le 5 novembre 2015, mise à jour le 20 octobre 2017