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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2015

Perennial Grass Response to Post-Fire Grazing Management in the Great Basin

Post-Fire Grazing

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : Perennial Grass Response to Post-Fire Grazing Management in the Great Basin

Identification : 2060-13610-001-29

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Start Date : Mar 16, 2015 End Date : Dec 31, 2019

Domaine : Great Basin Rangelands Research

Objectif
Our research will investigate perennial grass responses to alternative post-fire grazing management approaches, which addresses the ‘appropriate timeframe of grazing’ and ‘grazing techniques for promoting resiliency’ research needs stated in the original Science Support Project call for proposals. We will focus on grass tiller responses and plant reproduction because they are the most important factors dictating perennial grass survival and vigor after disturbances. In addition, we will examine seedling survival and growth of recruited seedlings to determine the impact of livestock grazing on their establishment. Our objectives are split into two parts that address (Part 1) surviving adult bunchgrasses and seedlings planted in rehabilitation projects (Part 2) and include : Part 1 1. For perennial grasses that have survived a fire, determine how season of defoliation affects tiller demography and inflorescence production. 2. For perennial grasses that have survived a fire, determine how number of years of post-fire rest from grazing affects tiller demography and inflorescence production. Part 2 3. Examine the effects of grazing on new seedling growth and survival established in post-fire rehabilitation treatments.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 28 septembre 2015, mise à jour le 12 octobre 2017