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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2008

SYNERGISTIC MONITORING FOR ADAPTIVE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT IN THE SAGEBRUSH ECOSYSTEM OF THE GREAT BASIN

Sagebrush Ecosystem

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : SYNERGISTIC MONITORING FOR ADAPTIVE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT IN THE SAGEBRUSH ECOSYSTEM OF THE GREAT BASIN

Identification : NEV052TB

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Jul 1, 2008 à Jun 30, 2012

Domaine : Management of Range Resources ; Desert and semidesert shrub land and shinnery ; Pinyon-juniper

Partenaire : UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA RENO

Objectifs
Objectives : 1. Inventory land treatment data available from agency offices. 2. Collect and analyze monitoring data from selected current, recent, ongoing, and planned land treatment projects to test hypotheses. 3. Collect the inventoried data from past projects, enter these data into the database, and analyze to test hypotheses 4. Continue to augment and refine the : table of projects to monitor ; monitoring data set ; table of monitoring data to acquire ; acquired data set ; analyses of the data ; and the products from the project. Outputs : Fact Sheets, Bulletins, and technically refereed journal articles

Descriptif
1. Travel to land and resource management offices and inventory the data available on past land treatments defined as any project covering an area greater than 1 hectare and designed to modify vegetation. The inventory will identify for each data set : location (geospatial) ; land ownership ; type of vegetation ; soil map unit and soil series treated ; ecological site(s) ; vegetation treatment(s) ; baseline data regarding soils, vegetation, wildlife, etc. ; monitoring data that has been conducted ; by whom ; where these data are stored and their format ; any special permission or protocols needed to access the data ; other relevant metadata ; 2. Collect and analyze monitoring data from selected current, recent, ongoing and planned land treatment projects a. Inventory current, recent, ongoing and planned projects by constructing a matrix noting location (geospatial) ; land ownership ; type of vegetation ; soil map unit and soil series treated ; ecological site(s) ; vegetation treatment(s) ; baseline data regarding soils, vegetation, wildlife, etc. ; monitoring that will be conducted by others ; who is going to collect the data ; monitoring that would be needed to determine if the project meets objectives ; additional monitoring data that would make the data interactive with a larger data set ; possible funders for further monitoring of this area/project ; and ecological thresholds, states and transitions or phases and pathways that this project would inform. Field data methods will be drawn from the Interagency Technical Reference, Sampling Vegetation Attributes (BLM 1999). b. Prioritize projects to monitor in the upcoming field season with identification of the monitoring methods to be used, experimental design, data storage, etc. c. Collect field data and metadata. Copy associated data from complementary monitoring of these projects d. Analyze combined data from valid experiments 3. Begin Collecting the inventoried data from past projects and entering these data into the database. These data collection processes include digitizing maps, copying electronic data sets, photocopying or scanning paper data sets, recording metadata ; and constructing a data base of these data. 4. As sufficient data become available, organize them into data sets that are comparable and begin analyses. Such analyses should lead to a variety of products including : 1.) Treatment project summaries for managers that identify if objectives were met for specific projects (for those locations where monitoring money was provided to determine this) ; 2.) Treatment type summaries that identify the conditions under which a particular treatment type tends to meet specific objectives, where it does not, and why ; and 3.) Vegetation type summaries that compare the effects from a variety of treatments for a vegetation type or for an ecological site or group of ecological sites. 5. Refine these products into manuscripts for refereed Journals, UNCE fact sheets and bulletins, and other agency publications. This process will include review and revision by coauthors and others as needed and appropriate.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 22 septembre 2015, mise à jour le 6 novembre 2017