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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2008 → PREDICTING THE RESPONSES OF CHAPARRAL TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA : IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER RESOURCES

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2008

PREDICTING THE RESPONSES OF CHAPARRAL TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA : IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER RESOURCES

Chaparral Climate Change

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : PREDICTING THE RESPONSES OF CHAPARRAL TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA : IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER RESOURCES

Identification : CA-R-BPS-7636-H-T

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Oct 1, 2008 à Sep 30, 2012

Domaine : Watershed Protection and Management ; Alternative Uses of Land ; Weather and Climate ; Soil, Plant, Water, Nutrient Relationships ; Plant Management Systems ; Conservation and Efficient Use of Water ; Conservation of Biological Diversity ; - Appraisal of Soil Resources ; - Basic Plant Biology ; Weeds Affecting Plants ; Communities, areas, and regions ; Desert and semidesert shrub land and shinnery ; Non crop plant research ; Weather ; - Chaparral and shrub lands ; Soil and land, general ; Watersheds and river basins, general ; Research equipment and methods, general/other ; Pinyon-juniper ;

Partenaire : UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE

Objectifs
The activities of the project are designed to determine how climate change will affect plant community composition in southern California, and how such changes will affect water cycling by plants. The overall objective is to predict how water resources will be affected by vegetation change.
Specific objectives include : 1) Determine how vegetation change will affect rooting depth by quantifying depth of water uptake for major plant functional types such as trees, shrubs, and grasses. The depth of water uptake relates directly to growing season length because deeper soil water is available longer into the summer drought. The use and redistribution of deep water sources can have major impacts on water supply to an ecosystem and this effect is large when considered at the global scale. 2) Compare ecosystem water cycling components between intact shrublands and shrublands that have been invaded by grasses to generate predictions of how the shift from shrubs to a mixture of shrubs and grasses will affect transpiration, plant water use, and soil water storage. 3) Examine the effects of precipitation events on plant water use. This will allow us to better understand how factors such as the time since wetting, dryness of the soil, or the physiological state of the vegetation, determine the amount of water used by plants. 4) Study the contribution of shrubs, trees, and grasses (plant functional types) to canopy water vapor in response to precipitation events to gain a greater understanding of how ecosystem water loss to the atmosphere is controlled by major vegetation types. 5) Understand the hydraulic strategies of native woody species to further predict how individual species are likely to respond to climate change, and refine our knowledge of which species are more likely to be threatened by alterations in precipitation regime.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 19 septembre 2015, mise à jour le 6 novembre 2017