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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2000

POPULATION AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF VERTEBRATE FAUNA OF THE CHIHUAHUAN DESERT ECOREGION

Vertebrate Fauna, Chihuahuan Desert

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : POPULATION AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF VERTEBRATE FAUNA OF THE CHIHUAHUAN DESERT ECOREGION

Identification : NM-1-5-27468

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Oct 1, 2000 à Sep 30, 2005

Domaine : Aquatic and Terrestrial Wildlife ; Wildlife habitats ; Endangered species ; Wild animals ; Wild birds

Partenaire : NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY 1620 STANDLEY DR ACADEMIC RESH A RM 110 LAS CRUCES

Objectifs
1) To examine the distribution of vertebrate fauna of the Chihuahuan Desert in relation to season, vegetative characteristics, range condition, prey availability and abundance, soil type, topography, elevation and climatic patterns. 2) To gain an understanding of basic lifehistory characteristics that may influence management decisions for migrant and resident birds of the Chihuahuan Desert Ecoregion. 3) To understand community structure and interactions of and among different taxa of the Chihuahuan Desert. 4) To address management issues for Chihuahuan Desert fauna on an ecoregional scale including the genetic structure of avian populations on breeding and wintering grounds and endemic herpetofauna, taxonomic status of selected species and landscape-level factors including the size, spatial configuration and connectivity of habitat patches.

Descriptif
Species Approach - The distribution and habitat associations of bird species will be examined in relation to habitat structure and floristic composition, precipitation patterns, temperature, age class (when possible), sex (when possible), morphology, body condition, food items, seed availability and behavior. Life history data will include whether wintering species occur in flocks or as solitary individuals, the size and species composition of flocks, and how individuals utilize habitats. For nesting species, data will include factors such as nest placement, territory advertisement and clustering of nests that may make certain species more vulnerable to nest parasitism and predation. For other vertebrate fauna, data will be collected on the distribution and habitat associations of individual species in relation to breeding condition and sex, habitat structure and floristic composition, soil type, precipitation and temperature patterns, and prey availability and abundance. Genetic markers will be used to look at the structure of wintering and breeding bird populations and the structure of endemic herpetofauna, examine the effects of habitat fragmentation on genetic structure and diversity of selected vertebrate fauna and to re-evaluate current taxonomic assignments of selected species. Community Structure - Community structure will be examined in terms of species composition and abundance, resident vs migrant status, morphology, body condition, food items, seed availability, habitat structure and floristic composition, and behavior. Landscape Scale - For a landscape analysis, a Geographic Information System (GIS) database will be constructed to examine the distribution and abundance of species in relation to landscape composition and configuration. Landscape composition will consist of patch type and habitat proportions. Landscape configuration will consist of patch size, patch shape and habitat juxtaposition/interspersion. These measurements will include a measure of landscape diversity (Shannon’s diversity index) and patch shape complexity. Layers of the GIS database will include information such as landownership, patch quality, management practices, presence of target species, genetic structure of populations of target species, surrounding land use, climate, precipitation, topography, soil type, etc. Genetic markers (sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA) that contain sufficient variation to identify structure in target populations will be used for selected species. This will likely include endemic herpetofauna and migratory birds. Studies of genetic structure of herpetofauna will provide information on the movement patterns of selected populations and the identification of barriers to movement. Genetic structure of breeding populations throughout the range of individual species of migratory birds will be used to identify population specific migration routes, wintering grounds and large scale movement patterns of wintering grassland birds within and between seasons.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 24 octobre 2015, mise à jour le 28 octobre 2017