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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2010

ANIMAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN SEMIARID ECOSYSTEMS

Waste Management Animal

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : ANIMAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN SEMIARID ECOSYSTEMS

Identification : OKL02784

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Jun 1, 2010 à May 31, 2012

Domaine : Soil, Plant, Water, Nutrient Relationships ; Nutrient Utilization in Animals ; Waste Disposal, Recycling, and Reuse

Partenaire : OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY STILLWATER,OK 74078

Objectifs
1) The objectives of the study are : 1) to determine best management practices for animal waste utilization in long-term reduced tillage cropping systems ; 2) to determine reduce gaseous emissions from animal waste ; 3) to evaluate the effect of animal waste management on determination of tetracyclines in environmental in the environment ; 4) to use diet modification to alter swine manure nutrient content ; 5) to evaluate the economic impact of indoor air quality and diet modification for swine.

Descriptif
Swine effluent will be land applied by selected N rates to no-till corn-wheat-sunflower and sorghum-wheat-sunflower rotations to determine agronomic rates under irrigation. Subsurface irrigation will be used as a method to apply swine effluent to irrigated cropping systems to reduce potential water contamination and reduce odor emission. Measurements of biomass production, nutrient uptake, and nutrient changes in the soil profile will be collected. Following land application, the fate and persistence of tetracycline’s in the soil environment from swine effluent is critical to understanding the impact on the agroecosystem. Additional work will be conducted to determine the effect of diet management on ammonia emissions from swine and animal performance. These experiments will be performed in a research finisher where quantitative measurement of nitrogen, phosphorus, and salt inputs and outputs can be determined during the life-cycle for growing finishing pigs in a commercial setting. In addition the liberation of ammonia, methane, and carbon dioxide from the pits will be quantified. This information will be used to evaluate system level economics of dietary changes to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus excretion and those from air quality improvements within and around confined swine feeding facilities. It will be accomplished by evaluating the economic trade off involved between using distiller grains and conventional diets not only on direct returns to the producer but also the implications of dietary change on excretion and subsequent nutrient recovery

Présentation : USDA

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