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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2000

MANAGING TRANSPIRATION EFFICIENCY : PRODUCTIVITY AND STABILITY IN SEMI-ARID CROP SYSTEMS

Transpiration, Semi-arid Crop

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : MANAGING TRANSPIRATION EFFICIENCY : PRODUCTIVITY AND STABILITY IN SEMI-ARID CROP SYSTEMS

Identification : KS570

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Jul 1, 2000 à Jun 30, 2006

Domaine : Plant Biological Efficiency and Abiotic Stresses Affecting Plants ; Plant Management Systems ; Hard white wheat ; Sunflower ; Grain sorghum ; Corn ; Soybean ;

Partenaire : KANSAS STATE UNIV MANHATTAN,KS 66506

Objectifs
1) Evaluate effects of crop sequences, cropping intensity, tillage and land heterogeneity on productivity, water use, soil water recharge efficiency and carbon sequestration for semi-arid cropping systems. 2) Identify crop management strategies to mitigate soil and water constraints to productivity and yield stability of grain and oilseed crops in semi-arid environments. 3) Investigate effects of water deficits, chilling and heat stress on carbon dioxide (CO2) assimilation responses of grain and oilseed crops to light, vapor pressure deficits, temperature and ambient [CO2].

Descriptif
Field and greenhouse experiments will be conducted at the Northwest Research-Extension Center (Colby, KS) to the following purposes. 1) Evaluate effects of crop sequences, cropping intensity, tillage and land heterogeneity on productivity, water use, soil water recharge efficiency and carbon sequestration for semi-arid cropping systems. 2) Determine effects of crop culture and timing of water deficits on canopy architecture, crop development, yield components, and water use efficiency, normalized for vapor pressure deficits (vpd). 3) Investigate effects of water deficits, chilling and heat stress on stress indices (Crop Water Stress Index, chlorophyll fluorescence, turgor and osmotic components of leaf water potential) and assimilation response functions for light, vpd, temperature and ambient [CO2]. Principle crops will include winter wheat, grain sorghum, millet, corn, oilseed sunflower, canola, safflower and soybean. Most field experiments will be conducted more than one year to evaluate treatment effects over multiple environmental conditions.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 27 novembre 2015, mise à jour le 28 octobre 2017