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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2009 → INNOVATIVE USE OF SEED COATING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE RESTORATION OF SOIL HYDROLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL PLANT COMMUNITIES IN BURNED SEMI-ARID RANGE

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2009

INNOVATIVE USE OF SEED COATING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE RESTORATION OF SOIL HYDROLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL PLANT COMMUNITIES IN BURNED SEMI-ARID RANGE

Restoration Semi-Arid Range

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : INNOVATIVE USE OF SEED COATING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE RESTORATION OF SOIL HYDROLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL PLANT COMMUNITIES IN BURNED SEMI-ARID RANGE

Identification : UTAW-2009-05295

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Sep 1, 2009 à Aug 31, 2013

Mots clés : post-fire restoration ; seed coating ; wetting agents ; water repellen ; cyhydrophobicity ; pinyon juniper ; woodland restoration ; surfactants ; cheatgrass landscape ; ecology ; remote sensing ; gis ; woodland encroachment ; runoff erosion ; institutional constraints ; native seed juniper

Partenaire : BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 775 WIDSTOE BUILDING PROVO,UT 84602

Objectifs
The long term goal of this research is improved establishment of functional plant communities following fire in PJ woodlands. To achieve this goal we are proposing an integrated science strategy to enhance post-fire rangeland restoration through : improving understanding of the ecohydrologic significance of soil water repellency as a temporal ecological threshold that impairs reseeding success ; the development of restoration technology to ameliorate these limitations ; and outreach to overcome cultural and institutional constraints for adoption of new approaches in rangeland restoration. Specifically, our first objective is to develop a knowledge base of the physical and temporal controls influencing the extent and severity of soil water repellency during PJ stand development and following fire. The second objective is to quantify the extent that water repellency influences establishment success of native vs. invasive species (e.g. cheatgrass). The third objective is to develop seed coating technology to apply newly-developed wetting agents to native seeds. We will evaluate the proposed technology for use as : a bio-stimulant for enhancing revegetation success of seedlings constrained by a post-fire water repellent soil layer ; as a weed combatant that provides coated seeds with a hydrologic advantage over weedy species ; and as a post-fire erosion control method for maintaining soil stability and water quality. The fourth objective will be to seek useful relationships between process knowledge developed in objectives 1-3, to facilitate the development of models that predict how current and future PJ woodland encroachment will impact soil health and revegetation success after fire ; incorporate knowledge gained into state and transition theory and Ecological Site Descriptions. Lastly, our fifth objective will be to enhance opportunities for land owners and land managers to confidently incorporate native species in restoration projects by lowering thresholds to knowledge, technology, access, and support

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 28 novembre 2015, mise à jour le 7 novembre 2017