Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2007 → OPTIMIZING INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT IN A WESTERN SEMI-ARID ALFALFA, COTTON, PECAN SYSTEM

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2007

OPTIMIZING INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT IN A WESTERN SEMI-ARID ALFALFA, COTTON, PECAN SYSTEM

Insect Pest Alfalfa Cotton Pecan

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : OPTIMIZING INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT IN A WESTERN SEMI-ARID ALFALFA, COTTON, PECAN SYSTEM

Identification : NM-109748

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Oct 1, 2007 à Oct 1, 2012

Domaine : Insects, Mites, and Other Arthropods Affecting Plants ; Integrated Pest Management Systems ; Upland cotton ; Long fiber cotton ;

Partenaire : NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY 1620 STANDLEY DR ACADEMIC RESH A RM 110 LAS CRUCES,NM 88003-1239

Objectifs
This project has the following objectives : 1) Determine which parasitoids of alfalfa weevil are successfully established in New Mexico, their relative efficacy and potential reasons for lack of success ; 2) Identify and develop management practices that are favorable for conservation of beneficial arthropods in a pecan, cotton, alfalfa system ; 3) Determine how plant phenology, plant population and irrigation timing affect temperature and relative humidity in cotton and pecan and subsequent effects on insect pest mortality ; 4) Evaluate variation in host plant resistance due to environmental interactions such as fertility, and water stress ; 5) Determine if Acala 1517 cotton can compensate for square or boll losses from insect pests, which would affect baseline predictions of value (lint weight and quality) by boll, node and position ; 6) Begin implementing IPM program in alfalfa, initially concentrating on alfalfa weevil.

Descriptif
1) Fields that have high numbers of parasitioids will be compared to those with very few parasitoids, comparing insecticide history and management options, eg., harvesting practices and proximity of potential refugia. Controlled field trials on commercial and University farms will be based on those results. 2) Bollworm eggs will be placed on cotton plants in tests to measure the effect of row spacing, row orientation, plant morphology, irrigation and seasonal differences on rates of predation. Eggs will also be placed in commercial cotton fields and pecan orchards at various distances from hay to determine rates of predation relative to proximity to hay. Tests will also be conducted to evaluate the seasonal rate of predation in cotton and pecans. 3) Field tests at the New Mexico State University experiment station in Artesia will be designed to test the effect of row orientation, plant population, row spacing, plant morphology, time of irrigation, and seasonal differences on crop microclimate and bollworm egg hatch rates in cotton. Irrigation, tree size and location effects will be evaluated in pecans. 4) Field tests will be conducted to determine if nitrate levels and vegetative growth affect plant resistance levels to bollworm or Cry1Ac levels in Bt cotton. Field tests will be also conducted to determine if nitrate levels and water stress affect plant resistance levels to bollworm or Cry1Ac levels. Multiple varieties and their recurrent parent varieties will be included. 5) Compensation for insect injury will be determined by manual removal of squares or bolls then harvesting by boll position or hand picking and pooling all nodes and positions for each plot. Cotman data will be collected for each plot to track development. Potential delays in development will be determined by nodes above white flower and nodes above cracked boll. 6) Alfalfa weevil populations will be monitored in southeastern New Mexico by sampling eggs, larvae and adults throughout the year. Eggs will be quantified using 0.02 m 2 samples of plant material with eggs extracted using a blender-flotation method. Alfalfa weevil larval density will also be estimated by collecting twenty samples of ten alfalfa stems and examining in the lab.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 16 décembre 2015, mise à jour le 4 novembre 2017