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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2000

CO2 EMISSIONS FROM THE DISSOLUTION OF SOIL CARBONATE AS A CONTRIBUTOR TO GREENHOUSE GASES

CO2 Carbonate Geenhouse Gases

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Identification : NM-1-5-28211

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Dec 1, 2000 à May 31, 2004

Mots clés : carbon sequestrants climate change carbon dioxide carbon dioxide enrichment emissions carbonates soil nutrients lime carbon isotopes stable isotopes rangelands range management soil chemistry acid rain soil acidity arid regions semi arid regions statistical analysis detection soil microbiology nutrient loss

Partenaire : NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY 1620 STANDLEY DR ACADEMIC RESH A RM 110 LAS CRUCES,NM 88003-1239

Objectifs
When acid is applied to calcium carbonate a chemical reaction occurs in which bubbles of carbon dioxide are released. This is perhaps one of the most familiar chemical reactions known to people with even a minor exposure to chemistry. The question addressed in this study centers around this reaction. When acid from acidic rain or microbiotic crust comes in contact with soil carbonate is carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere ? The objective of this study, therefore, is to determine if this reaction occurs. And if so, how much carbon dioxide is released annually ? This measurement is important because if we are to determine the potential of arid and semiarid soils to sequester carbon, we must know the amount of carbon released by these soils.

Descriptif
To answer the question of whether carbon dioxide is released by the dissolution of soil carbonate, we will use a statistical randomized block design of CO2 traps placed on the soil surface in an arid region of southern New Mexico. These traps will consists of a combination of soda lime powder and an infrared CO2 detector. The traps are inverted containers that allow water to enter and soak into the soil, yet due to a one-way valve, CO2 is not allowed to escape before being measured. In order to distinguish biologically-respired CO2 from carbonate-dissolved CO2, we will measure the carbon isotopes. From previous work on the soils we are studying, we know that biologically- respired CO2 has less 13C than carbonate-dissolved CO2. Therefore, we will be able to measure the relative contributions of CO2 from these two sources.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 15 octobre 2015, mise à jour le 28 octobre 2017