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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2009

INTEGRATING BIOTECHNOLOGY WITH CULTURAL AND CHEMICAL STRATEGIES FOR WEED MANAGEMENT IN FIELD CROPS

Biotechnology Weed Crop

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : INTEGRATING BIOTECHNOLOGY WITH CULTURAL AND CHEMICAL STRATEGIES FOR WEED MANAGEMENT IN FIELD CROPS

Identification : KS431

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Oct 1, 2009 à Sep 30, 2014

Mots clés : biotechnology ; corn ; critical periods ; cultural practices ; glyphosate-resistant ; herbicide efficacy ; integrated weed management ; nitrogen ; sorghum ; soybean ; sunflower ; weed competition ; weed ecology ; weed shifts ; weed resistance ; wheat

Partenaire : KANSAS STATE UNIV MANHATTAN,KS 66506

Objectifs
1)Evaluate integrated weed management (IWM) strategies for field crops in semi-arid environments, including characterization of the biology of troublesome weed species and factors affecting competitiveness. 2)Characterize how herbicide use pattern affects weed control, weed population dynamics, and changes or shifts in weed populations or spectrums, including management strategies to address weed spectrum shifts. 3)Evaluate herbicide-resistant crops and determine the efficacy, persistence, carryover potential, and rotational crop response to herbicides used or having the potential for use in Central Great Plains production systems.

Descriptif
Field experiments will be conducted at the KSU Agricultural Research Center-Hays, the Northwest Research-Extension Center at Colby, or occasionally on farmer cooperator fields in western Kansas to gain new knowledge and contribute to (1) improved understanding of crop-weed interactions, improved weed management guidelines, and improved accuracy of decision aid models ; (2) an assessment of risks and benefits of herbicide-resistant crops in agricultural cropping systems and impact of their continuous widespread use on the agro-ecosystem ; (3) use of multiple tactics to manipulate weed-crop associations that favor the crop at the expense of weeds ; and (4) the development and label use recommendations for new herbicides and previously registered herbicides having potential for use in Central Great Plains production systems. Studies will investigate the influence of weed density, time of weed emergence relative to the crop, and duration of weed competition on crop yield and quality ; investigate interactions between crop morphology (hybrid plant architecture), population density, row spacing, and herbicide treatment on weed population dynamics, control, and crop yield ; monitor weed populations over a period of years to assess the consequences of multiple annual application of glyphosate in glyphosate-resistant crops ; determine the effects of soil fertility on Palmer amaranth biology, competitiveness with sunflower, and susceptibility to herbicidal control ; and evaluate the efficacy, crop safety, and potential carryover of experimental herbicides in agronomic crops as affected by method and timing of application, rates, adjuvants, and tank mixtures. Most field experiments will be conducted more than one year and possibly at more than one location to expose the experimental variables to a range of environmental and edaphic conditions. Preliminary and/or supplemental greenhouse/growth chamber experiments will be conducted to help confirm, refine, and/or better understand physiological and ecological processes.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 29 novembre 2015, mise à jour le 7 novembre 2017