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SATREPS Japan (2009)

Improving Sustainable Water and Sanitation Systems in Sahel Region in Africa : Case of Burkina Faso

Water Sanitation Sahel

SATREPS : Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (Japan)

Titre : Improving Sustainable Water and Sanitation Systems in Sahel Region in Africa : Case of Burkina Faso

Don’t Collect and Don’t Mix : Clean Toilets for the "Land of Upright People"

Pays : Burkina Faso

Date Durée : 2009 5 years

Mise en œuvre
Coordination : Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University
Collaborateurs : The University of Tokyo / Kochi University of Technology (KUT)
Partenaires : International Institute for Water and Environmental Engineering (2iE)

Descriptif
Low cost and safety through a pipeless network
Burkina Faso is one of the poorest countries in the world, with 27.2% of the population at the poverty level. Many people become sick from water-borne diseases because the infrastructure for clean water and sanitation is not in place. There are many conditions needed for the water facilities that are introduced : for example, they must be able to withstand the harsh climate, and they should be easy to maintain at a low cost. The goal of this project is to create a system that does not collect wastewater in a single location but rather treats water on-site, and that separates water by use and quality rather than mixing it all together, in order to achieve a sanitary system with low costs. The new type of system to be developed to provide water and sanitation will not require a large-scale water distribution pipe network.
Bringing composting toilets to Africa to turn human waste into a source of income
Two models were proposed to match the population density and infrastructure level. In the rural area model, only the water for drinking is disinfected and filtered. Human waste is converted into fertilizer with composting toilets and the wastewater is used for irrigation, boosting income from agriculture. The urban area model uses vehicles to collect human waste, and wastewater is collected by individual communities. The technologies needed for each process are currently under development.

Présentation : SATREPS

Page publiée le 30 septembre 2015, mise à jour le 8 novembre 2017