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SATREPS Japan (2009)

Prediction of Climate Variations and its Application in the Southern African Region

Climate Variations Prediction

SATREPS : Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (Japan)

Titre : Prediction of Climate Variations and its Application in the Southern African Region

The “Virtual Earth” Will Change Agriculture in South Africa

Pays :Afrique du Sud

Date Durée : 2009 3 years

Mise en œuvre
Coordination : Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)
Collaborateurs : The University of Tokyo
Partenaires : Applied Centre for Climate and Earth Systems Science (ACCESS), etc.

Descriptif
Predicting climate variations up to a year in advance to mitigate the effect of abnormal weather
The southern African region is vulnerable to abnormal weather and researchers are trying to improve skills of seasonal forecasting to mitigate the impacts of abnormal weather. Specifically, they are using a high-resolution ocean-atmosphere coupled model (SINTEX-F) (a virtual earth on the Earth Simulator supercomputer that reproduces interactions between the atmosphere and oceans) to predict global climate variations up to one year in advance. These prediction results will be used to conduct downscaling seasonal prediction for southern Africa.
Seasonal prediction skills will also be applied in Japan
This project has clarified the mechanism of the subtropical dipole modes in the southern Indian Ocean and the South Atlantic, which induce abnormal weather in South Africa. It also successfully predicted heavy rainfalls during the summer of 2010-2011. In the future, this technology will be applied to agriculture, etc. in southern Africa and seasonal prediction in Japan.

Présentation : SATREPS

Page publiée le 22 octobre 2015, mise à jour le 7 novembre 2017