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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2012

ROLE OF MIXED CROP-LIVESTOCK SYSTEMS IN TRANSITIONING TO DRYLAND ORGANIC FARMING IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

Etats Unis

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : ROLE OF MIXED CROP-LIVESTOCK SYSTEMS IN TRANSITIONING TO DRYLAND ORGANIC FARMING IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

Identification : WNP06412

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Sep 1, 2012 à Aug 31, 2016

Mots clés : organic farming, mixed crop-livestock farming, sustainable agriculture, integrated agriculture, nitrogen budget, greenhouse gases, soil quality, sheep, grazing, cover crops, agroecosystems,

Partenaire : WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY 240 FRENCH ADMINISTRATION BLDG PULLMAN,WA 99164-0001

Objectifs
In April 2012, we established a long-term research project on a commercial grain farm in the Palouse region of Washington State. We are conducting this replicated study on a 2-ha parcel of the Zakarison Farm to measure the sustainability of three different farming systems : transitional certified organic mixed crop-livestock, integrated mixed crop-livestock, and conventional grain systems. Our goal is to improve the competitiveness of organic mixed crop-livestock systems and their potential adoption by growers in a mainstream conventional grain-producing region. Supporting research objectives include measuring agroecosystem components of the three farming systems as follows : Objective 1 : Examine the economic performance of mixed organic and integrated sheep-wheat farms compared to conventional wheat farms in the Palouse ; Objective 2 : Compare the total productivity of mixed organic and integrated farms to the productivity of conventional wheat farms, accounting for crops, feed, animal products, and weed management ; Objective 3 : Quantify total carbon footprint ; greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions including methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon dioxide (CO2) ; and ammonia (NH3) emissions from the three systems ; Objective 4 : Quantify nitrogen budgets for the three systems, including inputs from fertilizers, feeds, and livestock ; gaseous losses in the form of N2O and NH3, nitrate leaching, biological nitrogen fixation, and nitrogen mineralization in the soil ; Objective 5 : Measure chemical, physical and biological changes in soil quality through time for the three systems, including soil organic matter, soil microbial diversity and biomass, and potential for erosion (RUSLE) ; Objective 6 : Disseminate our findings to farmers, consumers, and research and extension agencies through presenting eOrganic webinars, articles, and chat sessions ; hosting field days on the Zakarison farm ; publishing extension bulletins and articles in popular trade journals ; and regularly presenting at extension meetings and regional outreach events ; and Objective 7 : Use our research findings to teach about novel agroecological concepts in Soils, Crops, and AFS (Agricultural and Food Systems) courses at Washington State University. Long-term systems research, such as ours, is required to understand the complex interactions of agroecosystem components and processes. This project addresses critical organic agriculture issues and priorities through the integration of research, extension, and teaching activites

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 10 novembre 2015, mise à jour le 15 novembre 2017