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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2001 → USE OF INHERITED STERILITY TO STUDY AND MANAGE C. CACTORUM, AN INVADING OPUNTIA-FEEDING MOTH

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2001

USE OF INHERITED STERILITY TO STUDY AND MANAGE C. CACTORUM, AN INVADING OPUNTIA-FEEDING MOTH

Inherited Sterility C.Cactorum

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : USE OF INHERITED STERILITY TO STUDY AND MANAGE C. CACTORUM, AN INVADING OPUNTIA-FEEDING MOTH

Identification : 6602-22000-034-05T

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Jan 1, 2001 à Dec 31, 2005

Mots clés : biological ; control ; sterile ; insect ; technique ; invasives ; pecies

Partenaire : AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE TIFTON,GA 31793

Objectifs
Cactoblastis cactorum will be used as a unique model system to conduct proof-of-concept studies to develop the use of inherited (F1) sterility as a new risk management tool for assessing the safety of exotic lepidopterans being considered as biological control agents for invasive weeds, and as a risk mitigation tool for invasive lepidopteran pests.

Descriptif
We will quantify radiation-induced, inherited sterility effects in C. cactorum ; test normal and reproductively inactivated C. cactorum against key native Opuntia species from across the U.S., Mexico and Central America to elucidate its potential host range ; determine temperature thresholds for overwintering and larval development to predict potential geographic range ; utilize F1 sterile eggs/larvae/pupae to determine the potential impact of native parasitoids/predators on the spread of C. cactorum ; develop mass-rearing technology for C. cactorum and conduct sterile insect release trials to measure the efficacy of the sterile insect technique as a control tactic for C. cactorum. Reproductively inactivated C. cactorum will be compared with normal C. cactorum for their host choice and ability to survive on various host species under field conditions, their movement/expansion in their natural habitat, and their susceptibility to mortality agents such as parasitoids and predators.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 6 décembre 2015, mise à jour le 29 octobre 2017