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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2010

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF TREE FRUIT AND NUT SPECIES : OLIVE CULTIVAR COMPATIBILITY RELATIONSHIPS

Tree Fruits Nut Olive

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF TREE FRUIT AND NUT SPECIES : OLIVE CULTIVAR COMPATIBILITY RELATIONSHIPS

Identification : CA-D-PLS-3913-H

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Oct 1, 2010 à Jun 30, 2013

Mots clés : olive ; olea europaea ; olive oil ; self incompatibility ; cross compatibiitly ; pollen ; pollination ; ssr ; microsatellite ; genotyping ; cultivar collections ; temperature ; supplemental pollination

Partenaire : UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS 410 MRAK HALL DAVIS,CA 95616-8671

Objectifs
Research is conducted on reproductive biology of tree-crop species with emphasis on olive (Olea europaea) cultivars suitable for oil production in California. Primary objectives are to expand scientific knowledge and understanding of those aspects of reproductive biology that can constrain or limit efficient crop production. Olive intervarietal compatibility relationships are poorly understood. California orchardists adapt cultivars from various locations in the traditional olive-growing areas of the Mediterranean basin. These include cultivars from Spain, Italy, France, Greece and North Africa. In the traditional growing areas, incompatibility relationships are of little concern because locally adapted varieties have been grown together for millennia. In new world production systems the use of diverse cultivars originating from various growing regions opens the possibility that intercompatible cultivars may not be grown together. In addition, olive compatibility relationships are often less clear than what is typical for other species. Olive compatibility is strongly temperature dependent. For example, ’Manzanillo’, the most widely grown table olive cultivar in California, behaves as a self-compatible cultivar in cool-climate growing regions, but requires a compatible pollinizer cultivar in warm-climate conditions. Our previous research demonstrated that ’Mission’ is incompatible with ’Manzanillo’ and unsuitable as a pollinizer. A primary goal will be to elucidate the compatibility relationships among the low-vigor, oil-olive cultivars, especially ’Arbequina’. ’Arbosana’. ’Koroneiki’, which are well adapted for and widely planted in super high density orchards, as well as some of the cultivars producing standard size trees that are being planted in less intensive production systems. A second objective will be to determine the extent to which incompatibility is temperature dependent. Table olive cultivars grown in the hot southern San Joaquin Valley exhibit marked self-incompatibilty. Most orchards there now include compatible pollinizers or employ supplemental pollination using pollen from a compatible cultivar. The same varieties grown in cooler locations are often fully productive without pollinzers or supplemental pollinations. Little is known about the temperature responses for the oil-producing cultivars noted above. The outputs of the research described here will be publications in the standard scientific literature and secondary publication in literature accessible to California olive growers. The data developed will be useful in planning orchard planting schemes or for suggesting orchard situations where supplemental pollination technologies may be appropriately employed. A third objective will be to continue our on-going research on olive cultivar identification. We have recently completed a survey of all the olive accessions in the major olive collections in the US including the National Clonal Germplasm Repository at Winters, California, Filoli Gardens, and the University of Arizona. These do not include several newly acquired Mediterranean oil cultivars. We will expand the database to include these and other new accessions

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 17 novembre 2015, mise à jour le 9 novembre 2017