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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2002 → AUTOMATED WIRELESS SYSTEM TO DETECT AND IDENTIFY MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLIES

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2002

AUTOMATED WIRELESS SYSTEM TO DETECT AND IDENTIFY MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLIES

Detect Identify Fruit Flies

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Research, Education & Economics Information System (REEIS)

Titre : AUTOMATED WIRELESS SYSTEM TO DETECT AND IDENTIFY MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLIES

Identification : 6615-22000-021-11S

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Aug 28, 2002 à Nov 30, 2005

Mots clés : automation insect detection agricultural engineering ceratitis capitata insect identification acoustics surveillance insect traps insect pheromones sex pheromones insect attractants citrus product quality pre harvest equipment development communication sensors wings insect flight algorithms signals verification

Partenaire : ASRC AEROSPACE, INC. 6301 IVY LANE, SUITE 300 GREENBELT,MD 20773

Objectifs
Develop an automated wireless system to detect and identify Mediterranean fruit flies (medflies) as they are captured in a baited trap and communicate the results back to a central location

Descriptif
Baited traps will be equipped with acoustic sensors to detect wing beats of incoming insects. The signals will be preprocessed and transmitted to a central location where they will be subjected to further digital signal analyses. A mathematical algorithm will be developed to compare an alaysis of the detected wing beat signal against analyses of previously verified pest insects, including male and female medflies. The output of the algorithm will include a "yes/no" decision about whether the signal matches the signals produced by medflies and a level of confidence in the match. The prototype detection/transceiver/analysis system will be field-tested to verify its efficacy.

Présentation : USDA

Page publiée le 26 octobre 2015, mise à jour le 30 octobre 2017