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Technische Universität Dortmund (2009)

Photovoltaics in government services in rural areas of tropical developing countries with special consideration of East Africa and Tanzania in particular

Byabato, Kamugisha A. W.

Titre : Photovoltaics in government services in rural areas of tropical developing countries with special consideration of East Africa and Tanzania in particular

Auteur : Byabato, Kamugisha A. W.

Université de soutenance : Technische Universität Dortmund

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2009

Résumé
This work is intended to be a policy reference paper for governments of tropical Developing Countries aiming at stimulating interest in application of Solar Electric systems i.e. or Photovoltaics (PV), (either alone or in combination with other energy resources) in rendering their services to their people. It is a PhD research thesis presented at Dortmund University Germany. As summarised in its title “Application of Photovoltaics in Government Services in Rural Areas of Tropical Developing Countries, with special consideration of East Africa and Tanzania as a typical example” this work deals with analysis of the current practices and existing potentials in the application of Solar Electric Systems, i.e. Photovoltaics (PV), in the provision of Government services, especially in rural and disadvantaged periurban areas of Tropical Developing Countries, where conventional grid electricity is either currently unavailable or erratic and, therefore, unreliable. The major part of field studies for this work was conducted in Tanzania but there are few case studies from other countries as well. It started at the end of 2004 end ended in 2008. In this research, we have been able to show that Photovoltaics (PV), either alone (standalone or island PV system solution) or in combination with other electric energy sources (Hybrid PV systems), is not only possible but is also a viable way of providing electric energy for Government Services provision in tropical developing countries. The “other” electric energy resources combined with PV can include such renewables as wind, mini-hydro and biofuels such as plant oil from Jatropha curcas seeds, other biodiesels and bioethanol that can be used either alone or in combination with non renewable fossil fuels such as ordinary diesel and petrol in modified or standard internal combustion engines coupled to ordinary generators. It has been shown that use of these methods can enhance and simplify provision and administration of Government services in some areas especially where costs of grid extension are not justified by the existing electric energy demand, or other financial and logistical considerations such as those encountered in the running of a small power generation and distribution system in a remote area running purely on diesel and/or other fossil fuels alone, where bulk fuel and lubricants procurement, transport and storage as well as equipment maintenance, safety and security are associated with special hurdles. Crowning all those considerations is the global necessity to preserve our earthly environment by employing PV either alone or in combination with other renewable energy resources and energy efficiency measures as a clean development mechanism (CDM), contributing to reduction in global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, while enhancing people’s quality of life, by empowering their governments to be able to effectively and efficiently guide and supervise their development towards achieving at least the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) by providing them with the required government services at minimal cost to the environment.

Mots clés  : Photovoltaics Solarelectric Rural electrification Tropical BIPV

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