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University of South Africa (2011)

Impact on climate change and adaptation on cattle and sheep farming in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

Mandleni, Busisiwe

Titre : Impact on climate change and adaptation on cattle and sheep farming in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

Auteur : Mandleni, Busisiwe

Université de soutenance : University of South Africa

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy in Environmental Management 2011

Description
This study focused on the impact of climate change and adaptation on small-scale cattle and sheep farming in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. Using information from 500 livestock farmers between 2005 and 2009 farming season, three methods of analysis were used to determine impacts of climate change and adaptation. They were Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Binary Logistic Regression Model (BLRM) and Heckman Probit Model (HPM). Findings revealed that cattle production decreased during the study period 2005 to 2009. Preliminary descriptive statistics results indicated that farmers had different perceptions on climate change and adaptation measures between the periods 2005 and 2009. Further analysis using PCA showed that the different perceptions could be grouped into : (i) drought and windy weather patterns ; (ii) information and adaptation ; (iii) climate change extension services ; (iv) intensive cattle and sheep production ; and (v) temperatures. The results of the BLRM indicated that the most significant factors that affected climate change and adaptation were : (i) non-farm income per annum ; (ii) type of weather perceived from 2005 to 2009 ; (iii) livestock production and ownership ; (iv) distance to weather stations ; (v) distance to input markets ; (vi) adaptation strategies and (vii) annual average temperature. From the HPM the results indicated that marital status, level of education, formal extension, temperatures and the way in which land was acquired, significantly affected awareness on climate change. Variables that significantly affected adaptation selections were gender, formal extension, information received on climate change, temperatures and the way in which land was acquired.It was concluded that in the area of study, change in climate was already perceived by small-scale cattle and sheep farmers. Households that perceived differences in seasonal temperatures during the survey period were less likely to adapt to climate change. Having access to extension services increased the likelihood of adaptation to climate change. Information on climate change to improve livestock production appeared to play a significant role in the selection of adaptation measures. The recommendation was that government should consider cattle and sheep farmers’ perceptions on climate change when deciding on programmes for cattle and sheep production. It further suggested that the most significant factors that affected climate change, adaptation, and awareness and adaptation selections be considered when adaptation programmes are planned.

Mots clés : Climate change, perceptions, awareness, adaptation, cattle and sheep farming, Eastern Cape province.

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