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Wageningen University (2015)

Cooperation in social dilemmas : considering sustainability options for Solar-powered Mosquito Trapping Systems (SMoTS) on Rusinga Island, western Kenya

Wijnands, M.

Titre : Cooperation in social dilemmas : considering sustainability options for Solar-powered Mosquito Trapping Systems (SMoTS) on Rusinga Island, western Kenya

Auteur : Wijnands, M. 

Université de soutenance : Wageningen University

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2015

Résumé
Rusinga Island in Kenya has been the stage for a research project called SolarMal. The aim of this project was to prove that malaria could be eradicated on Rusinga Island using Solar powered Mosquito Trapping Systems (SMoTS). These systems were constructed out of a solar panel, providing electricity, a mosquito trap with a newly developed attractant odour, two lightbulbs and a phone charging device. At the end of the research period (December 2015) the systems remain on Rusinga Island, but no plan has been made for the systems to be sustained by the inhabitants of the island. The aim of this Master thesis was to provide sustainability options to the Community Advisory Board (CAB) based on the preferences the CAB members and opinion leaders from the island display. The theory of choice for this thesis is Social Dilemma theory, as the situation of sustaining the SMoTS can be seen as a social dilemma. The main research question was : To what extent are individual or collective options preferred by different members of the Rusinga community in organising the sustainability of SMoTS and what motivations and experiences drive these preferences ? Various interviews with CAB members and opinion leaders have been conducted, as well as six focus group discussions. The data show that most CAB members and opinion leaders prefer individual solutions instead of collective solutions for sustaining the SMoTS, their preferences can be explained by the social dilemma factors of trust, sanctioning, group identification and leadership. The recommendations depend on whether the malaria suppression function of the system works or not, which is not yet known

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Page publiée le 5 février 2016, mise à jour le 20 octobre 2018