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Wageningen University (2015)

Participatory simulation to raise awareness about integrative planning for small water Infrastructures and drought control in semi-arid Mozambique

Legrand, C.

Titre : Participatory simulation to raise awareness about integrative planning for small water Infrastructures and drought control in semi-arid Mozambique

Auteur : Legrand, C.

Université de soutenance : Wageningen University Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2015

Résumé
In semi-arid areas where water is scarce and constraints on natural resources often limit rural livelihood opportunities, Small Water Infrastructures (SWI) are essential to local development. However, different studies evaluating the program and PRONASAR SWIs Mabalane, Mozambique, have shown that the hierarchical culture that prevails in their implementation and management does not take into account the diversity and complexity of interactions between actors’ strategies and natural resources and that it leads to an inequitable distribution of infrastructure. In addition, the sustainable and equitable management of natural resources is not considered an important element in the management of these structures, which jeopardizes the long-term livelihood strategies of beneficiaries and the ecological balance of the region. Thus, the planning of SWI development requires scientific attention, as does the classical and unresolved issue of SWI’s long-term sustainability. This paper argues that a participatory modeling and simulation approach helps local actors to better understand the interaction between resources and actor strategies, an understanding that, in time, could contribute to an integrative planning process. It draws on a companion modeling approach using the “Wat-A-Game” tool kit. The results of our pilot study show that the participants were able to acknowledge the local complexity associated with their livelihood strategies. In addition, some participants who were included in the overall process and could more easily extrapolate were able to reflect on local integrative planning. Keywords : water infrastructure, integrative planning, adaptation, companion modeling

Mots clés : rural development - participation - water availability - water management - integrated water management - infrastructure - livelihood strategies - adaptation - mozambique

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Page publiée le 5 février 2016, mise à jour le 16 octobre 2018