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Accueil du site → Master → Etats Unis → 2014 → Environmental constraints of Rüppell’s (Vulpes. rueppellii), pale (V. pallida), and fennec foxes (V. zerda), and golden jackals (Canis aureus) within the Termit & Tin Toumma Nature and Cultural Reserve and an analysis of pale fox food habits (Niger)

New Mexico State University (2014)

Environmental constraints of Rüppell’s (Vulpes. rueppellii), pale (V. pallida), and fennec foxes (V. zerda), and golden jackals (Canis aureus) within the Termit & Tin Toumma Nature and Cultural Reserve and an analysis of pale fox food habits (Niger)

Burruss, Nathan Dylan

Titre : Environmental constraints of Rüppell’s (Vulpes. rueppellii), pale (V. pallida), and fennec foxes (V. zerda), and golden jackals (Canis aureus) within the Termit & Tin Toumma Nature and Cultural Reserve and an analysis of pale fox food habits (Niger)

Auteur : Burruss, Nathan Dylan

Université de soutenance : New Mexico State University

Grade : Master of Science (MS) Wildlife Sciences 2014

Résumé
The Termit & Tin Toumma National Nature and Cultural Reserve in eastern Niger is Africa’s largest wildlife reserve and was created to protect the region’s floral and faunal communities, which include some of the rarest and most endangred Sahelo-Saharan speices. Political instability, insecurity and logistical difficulty coupled with relative neglect of desert biomes has resulted in informational gaps in some of the most basic biological aspects of the reserve. Recent surveys have shown that the reserve’s ecological integrity is at risk. Human-carnivore conflict poses the most immediate threat to the reserve’s carnivore’s members, however, the intensity and scope is unknown and managment without information of member’s basic ecology is difficult at best. To contribute to the knowledge pool and aid in management of the reserve we evaluated two components of the reserve’s canids. First, we examined eviromental requirements of Rüppell’s foxes (Vulpes rueppellii), pale foxes (V. pallida), fennec foxes (V. zerda), and golden jackals (Canis aureus) to investigate some of the underlying biological mechanisims dictating each species’ ecological role. We used maximum entropy modeling and the extention ENMTools to covariate drivers of each species’ distribution. Models indicated that jackals selected habitat based on prey availability instead of precipitation or temperature levels. Rüppell’s foxes selected areas with rocky substrate and co-occurred with jackals. Pale fox occurrece was most affected by precipitation and spatially avoided jackals. Fennec foxes exhibited the widest suite of environmental tolerances and co-occurred with both Rüppell’s and pale foxes. Second, we examined food habits of pale foxes and temporal patterns in food items. we present an examination of annual and seasonal prey frequency of occurrence and relative proportions in pale fox scats (n = 388). Arthopods, primarily belonging to Coleopteran, Orthopteran and Scorpiones, were presented in 91.8% of scats. Mammailian remains, primarily belonging to the genuis Gerbillus were found in 5.6% of scats. Avian, Squamate and plant material rarely occurred in scats. There was little evidence of seasonal variation in prey frequency of occurrence or propotions suggesting that pale foxes are primarily insectivorous and abl to locate their prey throughout the year.

Sujets : Canidae—Habitat—Niger — Canis aureus— Foxes—Food— National parks and reserves.

Présentation (NMSU Library)

Page publiée le 14 février 2016, mise à jour le 25 décembre 2017