Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Etats Unis → 2015 → Predictive model for night-blooming cereus (Peniocereus greggii var. greggii) : using maximum entropy modeling

New Mexico State University (2015)

Predictive model for night-blooming cereus (Peniocereus greggii var. greggii) : using maximum entropy modeling

Rodriguez, Ruben G.,

Titre : Predictive model for night-blooming cereus (Peniocereus greggii var. greggii) : using maximum entropy modeling

Auteur : Rodriguez, Ruben G.,

Université de soutenance : New Mexico State University

Grade : M.A.G. —Geography 2015

Résumé
Night blooming cereus is a rare and endangered cactus that occurs in the Chihuahuan desert. My study analyzed the relationship between presence-only data of night blooming cereus (Peniocereus greggii var. greggii) and the continuous and categorical habitat variables of elevation, aspect, soil and vegetation. The plant composition monitoring areas for this investigation were located in the Peloncillo Mountains in southwestern New Mexico. The areas selected for the final model consisted of four counties in southwest New Mexico including Hidalgo, Luna, Grant, and Dona Ana counties. Patterns of site location relative to the geographic variables were delineated using the Maximum Entropy Program (Maxent). This predictive model includes a cross validation process of ten replicates. Resulting models yield the average, maximum, median, minimum and standard deviation predicting the species’ distribution of the night-blooming cereus. This thesis investigation results in a spatial illustration of the preferred habitat of the night-blooming cereus produced using geographic data. This illustration will assist rangeland management specialists at the BLM Las Cruces District Office to better plan chemical brush control and fire treatments, and perhaps better understand the environments supporting this cactus in order to ease habitat destruction. The results of this thesis indicate that, out of the four variables used to predict the habitat of the cactus, two had the highest proportional contribution. The elevation variable contributed between 45.3 and 65.4 percent in all models, while the soils variable contributed between 18.1 and 26.3 percent in the predictive models. Furthermore, of the four models created, the discussion focuses primarily on the predictive model generated for Hidalgo County. The predictive model maps created in Maxent for the night-blooming cereus provide insight as to where the habitat for the endangered and special status cactus might be located throughout the range in southwest New Mexico.

Sujets : Cactus— Flowering— Geographical distribution— Mathematical models. Night-flowering plants — Geographical distribution—Mathematical models.

Présentation (NMSU Library)

Page publiée le 3 mars 2016, mise à jour le 25 décembre 2019