Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2010 → What is the impact of microfinance on poor people ? A systematic review of evidence from sub-Saharan Africa

UKAID Department for International Development (R4D) 2010

What is the impact of microfinance on poor people ? A systematic review of evidence from sub-Saharan Africa

Microfinance Poor People

UKAID Department for International Development (R4D)

Titre : What is the impact of microfinance on poor people ? A systematic review of evidence from sub-Saharan Africa.

Régions : Western Africa, Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Southern Africa

Projet de recherche pour le Développement :

DFID Programme : Systematic Reviews Programme

Organismes de mise en œuvre
Lead Institutes : Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London
Collaborating Institutes : University of Johannesburg

Durée : 01-05-2010 / 15-12-2010

Objectifs  : This study will review empirical research on the impact of microfinance on poor people in SSA to enable policy-makers, donors, and practitioners to understand the nature of the evidence available.

Descriptif
Microfinance principally encompasses microcredit, micro-savings, micro-insurance and money transfers for the poor. Microcredit, which is part of microfinance, is the practice of delivering small, collateral-free loans to usually unsalaried borrowers or members of cooperatives who otherwise cannot get access to credit.
Since the 1970s, and especially since the new wave of microfinance in the 1990s, microfinance has come to be seen as an important development policy and a poverty reduction tool. Some argue that microfinance is a key tool to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The assumption is that if one gives more microfinance to poor people, poverty will be reduced. But the evidence regarding such impact is both challenging and controversial. The debate on the impact of microfinance has heated up following the findings of two randomised control trials (RCTs) in the Philippines and India which raised questions about the impact of microfinance on improving the lives of the poor. These studies did not find a strong causal link between access to microfinances and poverty reduction for the poor. Reluctance to accept the findings has highlighted the a need for rigorous systematic reviews of the evidence of the impact of microfinance on the poor.
This review will look broadly at microfinance services, including both credit and savings, taking a holistic view of the evidence (with consideration of non-comparative impact studies and qualitative data, and impacts beyond just income-related outcomes). It will focus specifically within the geographical scope of sub-Saharan Africa.

Total Cost to DFID : £31,863

Présentation : UKAID

Page publiée le 24 septembre 2016, mise à jour le 8 novembre 2017