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Argentine (2007)

Small Mammal Assemblages on the Monte Desert, Argentina : Relationship with Habitat Complexity and Assemblages Rules

Rodríguez María Daniela

Titre : Small Mammal Assemblages on the Monte Desert, Argentina : Relationship with Habitat Complexity and Assemblages Rules

Pays : Argentine

Zone d’intervention : Monte Desert

Date : 2007

Bénéficiaire : Rodríguez María Daniela

Contexte
The Monte Desert Biome is the most diverse arid land in South America, mainly because of its endemic mammal species. Biotic (heterogeneity, complexity, productivity, etc.) and abiotic (temperature, precipitation, etc.) factors are likely to regulate mammal assemblage processes, and therefore the latitudinal pattern of diversity. According to current conservation and management goals, there is a big necessity to relate the scale of ecological patterns and processes and the scale at which they are described and measured.
Previous studies at local scale, carried out at the Ñacuñán MaB Reserve (Monte Desert Biome, Argentina) have yielded opposite results, either positive for small mammal-heterogeneity patterns in different habitats inside the protected area, or negative (for some species) between protected and unprotected surrounding areas. Nevertheless at regional level there is no information on this pattern along a productivity-heterogeneity gradient.

Description
The main goal of this project is to answer the question : How does small mammal assemblage diversity change along a geographical gradient in the Monte Desert, Argentina ? This project will primarily contribute to complete the distribution pattern of small mammals on the Monte Desert. Furthermore, associations between biodiversity and habitat complexity, heterogeneity and productivity will allow conservation biologists to predict species presence on other sites. Finally, understanding assemblage rules that regulate species associations and the role that each one plays is important to conservation plans.

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Page publiée le 20 septembre 2016, mise à jour le 20 mai 2018