Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → Projets de Fondations (Ecologie) → Indigenous Knowledge, Genetic Diversity and Domestication of Baobab Tree in Benin

Bénin (2006)

Indigenous Knowledge, Genetic Diversity and Domestication of Baobab Tree in Benin

Assogbadjo Achille Ephrem

Titre : Indigenous Knowledge, Genetic Diversity and Domestication of Baobab Tree in Benin

Pays : Bénin

Zone d’intervention : Bassila,Comè ,Natitingou,Boukoumbé

Date : 2006

Bénéficiaire : Assogbadjo Achille Ephrem

Contexte
Among the non-domesticated plant species, baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) is a multipurpose, widely-used species with medicinal properties, numerous food uses of various plant parts, and bark fibres that are used for a variety of applications. The species is classified by the International Plant Genetic Resource Institute (IPGRI) within the most important edible forest trees to be conserved and domesticated in Benin. To date, the species is facing regeneration problems and threatened in the parkland agroforestry systems of Benin by bush fire, agriculture, grazing and overexploitation.

Description
The use of molecular markers that quantify the genetic diversity within and between accessions as well as the ethno-knowledge on the species, may significantly increase the efficiency of the assessment and management of baobab germplasm. This could also help to get important information for assembling a core collection of baobab germplasm, taking into account the hierarchical structure of the genepool. In situ conservation would be done with local populations’ participation as natural genepool or parent seed bank stand in representative localities or units of conservation. As such, improved sustainable integrated crop systems could be developed and proposed to households for introduction in and through agroforestry systems.
This project on A. digitata will set the tone for similar studies on many other threatened edible plant species. It will provide the forestry department and other NGOs strongly involved in nature conservation with technical information for defining sustainable management plans of the species

The Rufford Foundation

Page publiée le 4 septembre 2016, mise à jour le 21 mai 2018