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Arizona State University (2016)

Characterizing Sustainable Performance and Human Thermal Comfort in Designed Landscapes of Southwest Desert Cities

Colter, Kaylee Renae

Titre : Characterizing Sustainable Performance and Human Thermal Comfort in Designed Landscapes of Southwest Desert Cities

Auteur : Colter, Kaylee Renae

Université de soutenance : Arizona state University

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2016

Présentation
During summer 2015, a study was conducted to characterize effects of tree species and shade structures on outdoor human thermal comfort under hot, arid conditions. Motivating the research was the hypothesis that tree species and shade structures will vary in their capacity to improve thermal comfort due to their respective abilities to attenuate solar radiation. Micrometeorological data was collected in full sun and under shade of six landscape tree species and park ramadas in Phoenix, AZ during pre-monsoon summer afternoons. The six landscape tree species included : Arizona ash (Fraxinus velutina Torr.), Mexican palo verde (Parkinsonia aculeata L.), Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.), South American mesquite (Prosopis spp. L.), Texas live oak (Quercus virginiana for. fusiformis Mill.), and Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.). Results showed that the tree species and ramadas were not similarly effective at improving thermal comfort, represented by physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The difference between PET in full sun and under shade was greater under Fraxinus and Quercus than under Parkinsonia, Prosopis, and ramadas by 2.9-4.3 °C. Radiation was a significant driver of PET (p<0.0001, R2=0.69) and with the exception of ramadas, lower radiation corresponded with lower PET. Variations observed in this study suggest selecting trees or structures that attenuate the most solar radiation is a potential strategy for optimizing PET

Mots Clés : Urban forestry / Landscape architecture / Sustainability / Landscape performance / Physiologically equivalent temperature / Shade / Thermal comfort

Résumé

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Page publiée le 17 novembre 2016, mise à jour le 16 juillet 2017