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National Science Foundation (USA) 2011

Quantifying Nitrogen Uptake in Bioretention Designed for Semiarid Climates

Nitrogen Uptake Bioretention

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Titre : Quantifying Nitrogen Uptake in Bioretention Designed for Semiarid Climates

Organismes NSF : Div Of Chem, Bioeng, Env, & Transp Sys (CBET)

Durée : October 1, 2011 - July 31, 2016

Description
Bioretention is a low impact development management strategy that employs engineered plant communities to reduce the impact of urbanization on stormwater runoff volumes and pollution. The proposed research expands the evaluation of bioretention and is guided by the theory that urban ecosystems can be engineered following basic ecological principles to sustainably perform a necessary service to society. The overarching goal of this research is to improve the understanding of how engineered ecosystems function in urban settings in order to optimize bioretention design by maximizing the service of watershed protection and minimizing the resources necessary to sustain the engineered ecosystem. This overarching research goal will be achieved by conducting two sets of experiments : (1) a two-year study to quantify nitrogen (N) treatment in bioretention over time and (2) an isotopic labeling experiment to describe plant contributions to the treatment processes for organic and inorganic N. Three plant community types will be tested using nine bioretention cells : a semi-arid upland shrub community, a wetland community, and a control with no plants. These experiments will test the following hypotheses : (1) the addition of vegetation cover will result in a greater overall retention of N, even under conditions where multiple stormwater events increase the residual level of N within each bioretention cell, (2) in cells without vegetation, the concentration of inorganic N in the effluent will be greater than the concentration of inorganic N in the influent, (3) in bioretention cells with vegetation, the concentration of inorganic N in the effluent will be less that the concentration of inorganic N in the influent.

Partenaires : Christine Pomeroy Christine.Pomeroy utah.edu (Principal Investigator)

Financement : $338,601.00

Présentation (National Science Foundation)

Page publiée le 19 février 2017, mise à jour le 12 novembre 2017