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University of Regina (2014)

Climate Change : Vulnerability and Adaptation, A Case Study of Men and Women Farmers in Eritrea

Tesfamariam, Yordanos

Titre : Climate Change : Vulnerability and Adaptation, A Case Study of Men and Women Farmers in Eritrea

Auteur : Tesfamariam, Yordanos

Université de soutenance : University of Regina

Grade : Master of Arts in Justice Studies 2014

Résumé
This study is based on qualitative research conducted by the writer using semi-structured interviews with key informants, including elderly male and female farmers. An analysis based on a theoretical framework of vulnerability and coping mechanisms was also conducted on the lived experience of farmers in Berik, in the Central Highlands, and Barentu/Sosona, in the lowlands of Gash Barka, related to climate change, including some practical recommendations they made to help them in their daily struggles for food security. Eritrea is a sub-Saharan African country suffering from food insecurity due to climate change. Subsistence-level rain-fed mixed crops and livestock comprised 95% of its agricultural products. Low rainfall and droughts adversely affect these products. Adaptation strategies are related to accessing natural resources, as well as political, economic, social, and cultural factors. Furthermore, climate change does not affect everyone in the same way. Female-headed farms, which comprise 30% in Eritrea, are affected differently than those headed by males and their adaptation strategies differ, especially in food production. Even though female-headed farms are important producers they do not have equal access to resources provided by the Ministry of Agriculture because they are not considered to be primary farmers. This situation is exacerbated by the limited availability and affordability of agricultural inputs such as land, fertilizer, seeds and labour. Four prevailing root factors emerged during this study. First was rain variability which impacted heavily on food security. Second were social/cultural views of women which prevented them from being regarded as equal primary farmers. Third was the indefinite national service, which removed farmers from their family farms, especially males. Fourth were state farms that sold products for foreign currency and used national service workers for labour, which conflicted with the needs of family farms

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Page publiée le 12 novembre 2016, mise à jour le 6 février 2018