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National Science Foundation (USA) 2005

Water flux and nitrogen cycling in the hyporheic zones of a semi-arid watershed : Hydrologic and geomorphic driving forces in a transitional climate

Semi-Arid Watershed Climate

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Titre : Water flux and nitrogen cycling in the hyporheic zones of a semi-arid watershed : Hydrologic and geomorphic driving forces in a transitional climate

Organismes NSF : Division of Earth Sciences ( EAR)

Durée : May 15, 2005 - April 30, 2011

Description
Hyporheic exchange, the temporary storage of surface water in stream bank sediments, affects the transport of solutes, including nutrients, through watersheds. Water diverted into the hyporheic zone has a longer residence time and more interaction with biogeochemically active sediments than water in other flow paths. Hyporheic flux rates and geochemistry have not been studied in semi-arid intermountain watersheds, transitional in climate between alpine catchments and desert lowlands. Hyporheic exchange in watersheds in humid regions is enhanced by stream meanders, variable flow rates, and sediment hydraulic conductivity. In water poor regions other geomorphic characteristics, particularly beaver dams, may equally influence hyporheic exchange.
We propose to complete an intensive study of hyporheic interaction and nitrogen uptake potential in an intermountain semi-arid watershed with significant beaver activity. The study will include field experiments and numerical hydrologic models designed to 1.) identify and quantify hyporheic pathways and fluxes of water and dissolved solutes across the surface-groundwater interface and 2.) identify the causes of hyporheic flux variability. We will test the hypothesis that in-stream flow obstructions, particularly small beaver dams, particularly enhance the extent of the hyporheic zone along semi-arid streams compared to the effects of other geomorphic and hydrologic controls.

Partenaires : Donald Siegel disiegel mailbox.syr.edu (Principal Investigator) Andria Costello Staniec (Co-Principal Investigator)

Financement : $744,069.00

Présentation (National Science Foundation )

Page publiée le 8 juillet 2017, mise à jour le 2 novembre 2017