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North Carolina State University (2015)

Exploring Vulnerability to Climate Change : Lessons Learned through Multiple Methodologies and Local Knowledge

Bulla, Brian Reid

Titre : Exploring Vulnerability to Climate Change : Lessons Learned through Multiple Methodologies and Local Knowledge

Auteur : Bulla, Brian Reid

Université de soutenance : North Carolina State University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2015

Résumé partiel
A majority of the climate change literature suggests the issue is best understood in scientific and technical terms, meaning that only experts with appropriate technical knowledge are suitably informed to understand the data and determine appropriate responses. Academics and experts who characterize climate change as a problem largely impacting roads, infrastructure, the economy, and other inanimate objects reify climate change as a technical problem. This reification can marginalize the vulnerabilities of people, livelihoods, and communities. Therefore, finding new pathways that expand our understanding of social vulnerability in the context of climate change is critical to improving policies and research practices. To do so requires using an extended community of knowledge beyond that of the technical experts. The additional knowledge would include concerned citizens with vested interests that might otherwise go un-discussed. By including participants external to the scientific community, a more well-rounded and inclusive discussion of climate change could be had, and decisions regarding what to address and how to address it would be created thereby addressing social vulnerability. This dissertation is comprised of three case studies that use multiple methodologies to explore elements of vulnerability to climate change. The first study used an online survey to quantitatively explore whether personal knowledge about climate change, political ideology, or a perceived threat from climate change affected the willingness of North Carolina coastal officials to take adaptive action. The study also investigated what official’s feel are the top threats from climate change to their communities. The second study utilized photovoice to qualitatively explore how small family farmers in Chatham County, NC are experiencing climate change. The third study used a rapid assessment and the Trinity of Voice (ToV) model of public participation to explore participatory processes from the point of view of water committee members in Hamakuya, South Africa to better understand water resource management practices in the context of climate change.

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Page publiée le 21 octobre 2016, mise à jour le 9 octobre 2018