Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Norvege → Agricultural Mechanization and Its Impacts on Land Use and the Food Basket in the Northern Savannah of Ghana : Insights from Navrongo in the Upper Easta Region

University of Bergen (2016)

Agricultural Mechanization and Its Impacts on Land Use and the Food Basket in the Northern Savannah of Ghana : Insights from Navrongo in the Upper Easta Region

Kansanga, Moses Mosonsieyiri

Titre : Agricultural Mechanization and Its Impacts on Land Use and the Food Basket in the Northern Savannah of Ghana : Insights from Navrongo in the Upper Easta Region

Auteur : Kansanga, Moses Mosonsieyiri

Université de soutenance : University of Bergen

Grade : Master thesis (2016)

Résumé
Smallholder agriculture in the northern savannah of Ghana is largely rain-fed, with limited facilities for irrigation. The difficulty with the use of crude hand-held farm inputs (e.g. cutlass, axe, hoe, etc.) to cultivate vast farmlands expeditiously have meant that farmers are compelled to prepare their fields timely and plant in a strategic manner with the onset of rainfall to minimize crop failure. Land preparation and crop cultivation at specific periods in relation to the observed rainfall pattern is hence a risk-spreading or risk-minimizing strategy adopted by farmers in response to a severe seven-month long period of drought (October to April) in the savannah region of northern Ghana. Under such problematic environmental conditions, farmers’ failure to adhere to this conventionalised farming strategy often causes hefty crop loses. The recent changes in the timing and distribution of rainfall caused by climate change and the limited information to monitor erratic climatic patterns have created uncertainty regarding suitable cultivation periods for specific crops. Over the years, smallholder farmers are actively responding to these challenges by adopting new technologies in their farm operations. During the last two decades in the northern savannah, there have been a shift from crude hand-tool technology in land preparation to the use of bullocks and more recently tractors. Whilst mechanization is regarded as a positive development in reducing drudgery and increasing agricultural productivity, tractor-based mechanization (henceforth called tractorization’) in the northern savannah have potential implications for land use (tenure and pattern) as well as the crop cultivation patterns. The study uses a mixed method approach (semi-structured interviews, group interviews, GIS techniques, field observation and photos) and theories of social capital and entitlements to examine the nature of agricultural mechanization and its implications for farm sizes, land access and the crop type and pattern in the study area. Using GIS techniques to map and compare farm areas of respondents in the 2005 planting season when tractor was relatively minimal and those of the 2015 planting season

Mots clés : Mechanization ; Farmers ; Entitlements ; Social Capital ; Savannah ; Climate Change ; Navrongo ; Ghana

Présentation

Version intégrale (3,33 Mb)

Page publiée le 19 novembre 2016, mise à jour le 25 janvier 2019