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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1982 → Demographic transition in developing areas : population change in Kericho District, Kenya, 1905 to 1969

Syracuse University (1982)

Demographic transition in developing areas : population change in Kericho District, Kenya, 1905 to 1969

Lura, Russell Paul

Titre : Demographic transition in developing areas : population change in Kericho District, Kenya, 1905 to 1969.

Auteur : Lura, Russell Paul

Université de soutenance : Syracuse University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1982

Résumé
This research examined the usefulness of the demographic transition theory in predicting local population response to socioeconomic development. Data from the former Kipsigis land unit within Kericho District, Kenya—an area which has undergone rapid social, economic, and demographic change—was used to assess the relationship between development and population change. The research included, first, the mapping and analysis of (1) the distribution, settlement, and density of population, (2) the age-sex composition, and (3) the fertility and migration of the Kipsigis of Kericho District. Second, it surveyed the social, cultural, and economic changes which occurred in the district. Both processes—demographic and socioeconomic change—were examined within a temporal and spatial framework in order to assess hypothesized relationships between them. It was found that prior to the establishment of a colonial presence, fertility among the Kipsigis was relatively low, maintained at that level through polygyny and through a late age at circumcision for both males and females, which in turn led to a late age at marriage. All three practices were consequences of an economic system that relied on cattle for subsistence and wealth. The introduction of taxes, a market economy, and maize as a subsistence and cash crop effected declines in the age at initiation, the age at marriage, and the practice of polygyny. As a result, fertility increased. The increase was sustained by the introduction of western medical care and the beginnings of formal Western education. Concurrently, relatively low death rates declined even further creating high rates of population growth. Fertility continued to increase until the 1960s when an incipient decline can be discerned. The main variables contributing to the peak and decline were education and income, operating mainly through the intervening variable, age at marriage. The process can be seen at work throughout the former Kipsigis land unit. The areas which became centers of economic and social innovation were the first to have increased fertility, the first to reach a fertility peak, and the first to show signs of a fertility decline. The areas which were the last to adopt the innovations were still in a stage of fertility increase.

Sujets : Kipsigis (African people) ; Ethnology ; Population growth ; Rural development ; Socioeconomic factors ; Kericho District ;

Présentation de la thèse

Page publiée le 13 décembre 2016