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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Allemagne → 2005 → The impact of alien plant invasions on biodiversity in South Africa : the case of alien Acacia species in the Gauteng and Chromolaena odorata in the KwaZulu Natal Provinces

Brandenburg University of Technology (BUT) Cottbus (2005)

The impact of alien plant invasions on biodiversity in South Africa : the case of alien Acacia species in the Gauteng and Chromolaena odorata in the KwaZulu Natal Provinces

Fonche, Florentin Mongeng

Titre : The impact of alien plant invasions on biodiversity in South Africa : the case of alien Acacia species in the Gauteng and Chromolaena odorata in the KwaZulu Natal Provinces

Auteur : Fonche, Florentin Mongeng

Université de soutenance : Brandenburg University of Technology (BUT) Cottbus

Grade : Doctoral Thesis 2005

Résumé
In this research work, the causes and solutions to the loss of biodiversity in South Africa especially along river-banks is dealt with significantly. Attempts are made to point out issues tied to the prevailing water crisis and ecosystem fragmentation for scientists and policy-makers. Based on the empirical field work done the writer succinctly has come up with some recommendations on the issues per se. In sum, the recommendations suggest the best ways to deal with the alien invasive species which is nothing short of the integrative approach, nonetheless designed to function at its maximum and in conjunction with locally available materials, manpower, will and on the spot expertise. Also, the study depicts the rapid spread of Acacia species and Chromolaena odorata across the African continent could lead to an environmental catastrophy should appropriate measures not be taken henceforth. The findings also bring to light the necessity of co – ordination of all key players in this fight against alien invasive plant species and giving clues (suggestions or hints) on how concrete environmental policies can be designed in order to match with the objectives of ecologists and other concerned experts alike. Taking this route the study unfolds with compounding suggestions on what the African governments and experts (ecologists, conservationists, and hydrologists) on the field should inter alia do to avert this looming disaster

Mots clés : Acacia species ; Alien invation ; Biodiversity ; Chromolaena odorata ; Impact

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Page publiée le 18 mars 2008, mise à jour le 29 décembre 2018