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St. Paul’s University, Kenya (2011)

Factors affecting small scale farmers accessibility to agricultural credit in Embu county : a case study of the Kenya Agricultural Productivity Program (KAPP)

Mbagara, John Kere

Titre : Factors affecting small scale farmers accessibility to agricultural credit in Embu county : a case study of the Kenya Agricultural Productivity Program (KAPP)

Auteur : Mbagara, John Kere

Etablissement de soutenance : St. Paul’s University, Kenya

Grade : Master of Arts (MA) 2011

Résumé
Microfinance is one of the major rural development tools that have gained popularity in the last three decades, particularly in developing countries. Concerted efforts have been made to increase credit availability to rural communities with new lending systems and linkages that seek to strengthen the formal and informal lending sector. However, lending to rural small scale farmers still appear limited, with many studies citing inadequate credit as a challenge to increased agricultural productivity. This study aimed at establishing whether credit facilities available in Embu County are accessible to small scale farmers. The study set out to establish factors affecting credit accessibility to small scale farmers. In this study both micro finance service providers’ characteristics as well as the farmers’ socio economic characteristics were explored. The research employed a case study design of farmers who are involved in the Kenya Agricultural Productivity Program (KAPP). Using survey data as well as secondary data the study reviewed the operations of the existing formal credit facilities serving the rural microenterprise sector in the district. The study has generated useful information that can aid in the decision making process for the enhancement of access to credit by majority of small scale farmers. The major findings of the study indicated that 49 % of farmers involved had accessed farming credit between 2005 and 2011. This evidence suggests that credit is indeed available in this area and most institutions are making efforts to improve their products in order to make them ’small scale farmer friendly’. However the gains so far created need to be enhanced in order to sustain a momentum that can convince the other half of non borrower farmers to engage in utilizing microfinance in boosting small scale agricultural productivity and accelerate development of agro processing cottage industries in rural areas. The major factors identified as affecting accessibility include distance to lending institution, extension services, age and risk averseness. The study found out that credit is not reaching the lowest socio economic class of farmers. This findings call for more research on how to make microfinance a more effective tool in contributing towards the Millennium Development Goals (MOGs) and particularly Goal I on poverty alleviation

Sujets : Credit ; Farmers ; Small business ; Entrepreneurs ; Poverty ; Kenya Agricultural Productivity Program ; Embu County ;

Présentation

Page publiée le 15 décembre 2016