Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1992 → Population pressures, environmental degradation and farmers’ adaptive strategies in Nakuru District of Kenya

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (1992)

Population pressures, environmental degradation and farmers’ adaptive strategies in Nakuru District of Kenya

Aboud, Abdillahi Abdulkadir

Titre : Population pressures, environmental degradation and farmers’ adaptive strategies in Nakuru District of Kenya.

Auteur : Aboud, Abdillahi Abdulkadir

Etablissement de soutenance : University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1992

Résumé
The aims of this Kenyan study in Njoro Division of Nakuru District were to determine 1) if population growth and pressure were experienced, 2) farmers’ experiences with environmental problems, and 3) what antecedent variables are related to the adoption of adapted strategies. A comparison was also made between experiences with adaptive strategies and perceptions of strategies. Independent variables were experiences with environmental problems (soil erosion, low soil fertility, decreasing farm production, and difficulty in finding good farmland to rent or purchase) ; perception of severity of environmental problems ; experience with environmental problems ; demographic characteristics ; farm and farmer’s characteristics ; and socioeconomic characteristics. Adaptive strategies included farm production intensification, soil conservation, labor export, and farm expansion. Analysis of household data collected in a stratified (land ownership, farm size, topography) sample survey of 300 agricultural farmers in July and December 1990 involved descriptive, correlation, factor, and multivariate analyses. The findings revealed high population growth and density in the study area. Farmers (37%) were aware of environmental problems. Some experienced all 11 environmental problems to a varying degree. The most common problems were soil fertility losses, productivity declines, weed increases, and decreases in fodder. 69.3% saw soil fertility loss as a serious problem. Their perceptions did affect the adoption of adaptive intensification and conservation strategies, which were intercorrelated. None of the sociopsychological factors showed an influence on intensification, labor export, or farm expansion. Conservation was employed, when the problem was uncommon and severe. More experience with food production or soil erosion problems meant less conservation. Perception of worsening of soil erosion led farmers to intensify production and conservation. 4 antecedent variables (off-farm) employment, increase in family size, number of dependents, and change in farm size) predicted the adoption of intensification. Conservation was associated with 7 antecedents, and adoption of labor export with 5 factors. 4 factors predicted farm expansion. Perception and experience interact with antecedent conditions (demographic variables) to determine the adoption of adaptive strategies.

Sujets : Population growth ; Agricultural economics ; Land economics ; Farming ; Njoro Division, Nakuru District ;

Présentation

Page publiée le 20 décembre 2016, mise à jour le 28 mars 2019