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University of Kentucky (2003)

The dynamics of cattle trading in northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia : the role of trust and social relations in market networks

Mahmoud, Hussein Abdullah

Titre : The dynamics of cattle trading in northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia : the role of trust and social relations in market networks

Auteur : Mahmoud, Hussein Abdullah

Université de soutenance : University of Kentucky

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2003

Présentation
African economies are plagued with economic and political uncertainties, which especially affect pastoral communities on the continent. The study of risk perception among pastoral populations is an important area of research, since these communities live in regions of extreme ecological, economic, and political volatilities. One important way that these populations address risk is by investing in social relations and institutions. These kinds of arrangements (often called ’social capital’) help to buttress against devastating loses associated with unforeseen risks and uncertainties. The focus of this dissertation is to understand the key social mechanisms and risk management strategies utilized in the cattle trade of northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia. It highlights the significant role that trust and social relations play in minimizing risks for traders in particular. This study contributes both to the literature on pastoralism and development anthropology in the Horn of Africa. It is the first dissertation research undertaken in Moyale District, Kenya on an important and timely subject of cattle trading and market networks and how they contribute to local livelihoods. In their efforts to minimize and where possible to eliminate risks, traders act individually and collectively and, consequently, form risk reducing mechanisms both at local and regional levels. These arrangements not only curb recurrence of trading risks, but they also help to improve cattle exchange at all levels of the trading chain and thereby enhance livelihood systems of businessmen and other market actors. Over a period of approximately 16 months the study utilized various research methods, including survey questionnaires, in-depth interviews, detailed case histories, and participant observation. Archival information also was used to reconstruct the economic and political history of Moyale area in northern Kenya. By using multiple methods and sources of information, the study documents the complex social, economic, and political processes that have shaped long-distance livestock trade in the northern Kenya/southern Ethiopia region

Sujets : Anthropology ; Cattle industry ; Northern Kenya ; Ethiopia ; Socioeconomic factors ; Ethiopia ;

Résumé (Research Kenya)

Page publiée le 19 décembre 2016, mise à jour le 29 mars 2019