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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Allemagne → 2007 → Now you have a new pump, you have to manage it : household water management, water rights and institutional change in Northern Ghana

University of Cologne (2007)

Now you have a new pump, you have to manage it : household water management, water rights and institutional change in Northern Ghana

Eguavoen, Irit

Titre : Now you have a new pump, you have to manage it : household water management, water rights and institutional change in Northern Ghana

Auteur : Eguavoen, Irit

Université de soutenance : University of Cologne

Grade : PhD thesis in Social Anthropology 2007

Résumé
Present drinking water policy for rural Africa is based on the assumption that community-based management entails more local decision-making power, improved access and better sustainability in water supply. Ghana has realized this vision in its National Community Water and Sanitation Program (NCWSP). Ownership and management of hand pumps as well as of small town water systems were transfered from the Ghana Water Company Limited (GWCL) to local water users. Different to the general perception that community-based management was an innovation after centralized management approaches, local water users have always organized and managed their water supply and created a local system of rules and regulation. Thus, community-based water management is not only a policy innnovation but also a long-established practice which underwent historical change. Even though the same policy is applied for rural hand pumps and small town water systems, the first seems to have been more sucessfully implemented. Due to a lack of studies, which describe institutional change in local water management when shifting from hand pumps to piped systems, no explanation could be offered so far for this difference in policy implementation and outcome. The research presents empirical data on the formation and conceptualization of water user groups of improved and unimproved water sources. Especial focus was given to local institutions of household water management as well as their change under the NCWSP. Moreover, local interest and social dynamics in water development projects were investigated. The study shows how the resource water is interwoven with rural and peri-urban livelihood systems in Northern Ghana. It approached the subject household water management via legal anthropology, political economy, political ecology as well as history. The management of household water serves as an example for analysing the interplay between natural, and socio-political environment by stressing changes in local water rights and water allocation practice.

Mots clés : Ghana, water rights, drinking water, community-based management

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Page publiée le 19 mars 2008, mise à jour le 13 mai 2019